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Red is the new orange


TRURO – For most 18-year-old athletes, stepping into one of the strongest lineups in the country could be an intimidating leap. But not for Ben Gorringe.

After three years wearing Cobequid Cougar orange, Gorringe will suit up for the University of New Brunswick Varsity Reds next season.

Walking into the second-ranked program in the country, he’s ready to fight for playing time in his freshmen season.

“I’m actually looking forward to the challenge,” he said. “Playing around here, you don’t always get the best level of soccer, so I’m looking forward to being surrounded by great players and great coaches.”

In his three years of high school soccer, Gorringe shattered CEC scoring records and helped his team to a provincial bronze medal in 2013. The offers began flooding in from universities at the beginning of the school year, making Gorringe one of the most sought-after players in Atlantic Canada.

“At the beginning it was kind of overwhelming,” he said. “Anyone making that kind of decision, it’s a little difficult.”

In the end, Gorringe settled on UNB – the reigning Atlantic University Sport champions who lost a disappointing national quarterfinal match in penalty kicks.

Despite a roster full of skill and experience, Gorringe said he isn’t nervous about fitting in. After all, this jump pales in comparison to the decision he made to play in the provincial men’s premier league three years ago.

“My first game I was 14,” he said with a laugh. “It was pretty overwhelming. You’d think they’d take it easy on you, but they don’t. I remember going home a couple days with some bruises. It was kind of intimidating, but you grow into it quick.”

What followed was an incredible career with the Cougars, where he turned heads with his ferocious two-way play.

“It’s no coincidence the most successful three-year stint we had was with him in midfield,” said Cougars coach Jay Foster.

Unlike most elite players who save their best for provincial and Atlantic soccer, Gorringe didn’t do that, Foster said.

“Ben was the opposite. He was totally committed to his high school soccer coaches and teammates. He bought in, which was a big deal because not everybody does. That will be a big part of his legacy for me – how he treated it like a professional.”

For Gorringe, high school was where he learned his true potential.

“It was eye-opening,” he said. “It helped me kind of realize how good I was as a player. Sometimes I struggled with confidence or whatever on the field, but CEC really helped me with that, to realize I was a good enough player to play in the CIS and do what I wanted to do.”

Foster hopes this coming season will prove to be the same thing again.

“He’s a star still rising, because he’s really, really, really committed to the game. He’ll thrive in that environment.”

The Reds only have three vacancies from graduates next season, but two of them are at midfield. Gorringe hopes to log as many minutes as possible and make himself a key part of the team moving forward.

Foster, meanwhile, won’t soon forget the feeling of having a player in the midfield capable of scoring at will.

“That will be fresh memories for everyone for a while. I can’t wait to watch him play this year.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

After three years wearing Cobequid Cougar orange, Gorringe will suit up for the University of New Brunswick Varsity Reds next season.

Walking into the second-ranked program in the country, he’s ready to fight for playing time in his freshmen season.

“I’m actually looking forward to the challenge,” he said. “Playing around here, you don’t always get the best level of soccer, so I’m looking forward to being surrounded by great players and great coaches.”

In his three years of high school soccer, Gorringe shattered CEC scoring records and helped his team to a provincial bronze medal in 2013. The offers began flooding in from universities at the beginning of the school year, making Gorringe one of the most sought-after players in Atlantic Canada.

“At the beginning it was kind of overwhelming,” he said. “Anyone making that kind of decision, it’s a little difficult.”

In the end, Gorringe settled on UNB – the reigning Atlantic University Sport champions who lost a disappointing national quarterfinal match in penalty kicks.

Despite a roster full of skill and experience, Gorringe said he isn’t nervous about fitting in. After all, this jump pales in comparison to the decision he made to play in the provincial men’s premier league three years ago.

“My first game I was 14,” he said with a laugh. “It was pretty overwhelming. You’d think they’d take it easy on you, but they don’t. I remember going home a couple days with some bruises. It was kind of intimidating, but you grow into it quick.”

What followed was an incredible career with the Cougars, where he turned heads with his ferocious two-way play.

“It’s no coincidence the most successful three-year stint we had was with him in midfield,” said Cougars coach Jay Foster.

Unlike most elite players who save their best for provincial and Atlantic soccer, Gorringe didn’t do that, Foster said.

“Ben was the opposite. He was totally committed to his high school soccer coaches and teammates. He bought in, which was a big deal because not everybody does. That will be a big part of his legacy for me – how he treated it like a professional.”

For Gorringe, high school was where he learned his true potential.

“It was eye-opening,” he said. “It helped me kind of realize how good I was as a player. Sometimes I struggled with confidence or whatever on the field, but CEC really helped me with that, to realize I was a good enough player to play in the CIS and do what I wanted to do.”

Foster hopes this coming season will prove to be the same thing again.

“He’s a star still rising, because he’s really, really, really committed to the game. He’ll thrive in that environment.”

The Reds only have three vacancies from graduates next season, but two of them are at midfield. Gorringe hopes to log as many minutes as possible and make himself a key part of the team moving forward.

Foster, meanwhile, won’t soon forget the feeling of having a player in the midfield capable of scoring at will.

“That will be fresh memories for everyone for a while. I can’t wait to watch him play this year.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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