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An outpouring of community support


TRURO – It took more than four times as long for one woman to drive into Truro from Onslow Mountain in inclement weather to drop off her donation to the Colchester Food Bank’s 12-hour food drive Wednesday.

One man stopped by the truck on Commercial Street to show volunteers the 160 bags of potatoes before he delivered them directly to the food bank.

And day-care clients climbed their way up the steps to watch as their bags of food were weighed.

It was those types of gestures that had Mary DeAdder’s spirits high on Wednesday as 49,169 pounds of food were donated during the facility’s annual food drive.

“It inspires me to think that these people are really caring for their friends and their neighbours who maybe need some help,” said DeAdder while volunteers continued to collect food and monetary donations from motorists and organizations.

“I really feel good about this day. It’s an opportunity to see Colchester County work together in support of the food bank. It’s really a good feeling.”

But it was also the volunteers that DeAdder was impressed with, with many of them having arrived on site before the food drive began at 6 a.m. Many stayed until the end.

“We have one volunteer from Upper Stewiacke who was here at 5 a.m. just to help us,” she said. “Six was our starting time, and the representatives from the radio stations had a couple of bags for us at that time too.

“Everybody is working on their food bank. It’s the community’s food bank, and that’s not an exaggeration.”

The Truro Lions Club donated $5,000 to the cause, which was equivalent to 5,000 pounds of food. In addition, Scotia Bank matched donated $5,000 and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Colchester stopped by with a cheque for $500 from their supporters and volunteers.

“We’ve had large donations even from individuals this year,” she said.

In the run of a month, the food bank operates an average of 22 days. Within those 22 days, new clients are always coming in.

“We will get anywhere from 25 to about 47 in those 22 days. And sometimes we will get emergency calls through other organizations such as the Red Cross, the fire department or even churches.”

 

rtetanish@trurodaily.com

Twitter: @TDNRaissa

One man stopped by the truck on Commercial Street to show volunteers the 160 bags of potatoes before he delivered them directly to the food bank.

And day-care clients climbed their way up the steps to watch as their bags of food were weighed.

It was those types of gestures that had Mary DeAdder’s spirits high on Wednesday as 49,169 pounds of food were donated during the facility’s annual food drive.

“It inspires me to think that these people are really caring for their friends and their neighbours who maybe need some help,” said DeAdder while volunteers continued to collect food and monetary donations from motorists and organizations.

“I really feel good about this day. It’s an opportunity to see Colchester County work together in support of the food bank. It’s really a good feeling.”

But it was also the volunteers that DeAdder was impressed with, with many of them having arrived on site before the food drive began at 6 a.m. Many stayed until the end.

“We have one volunteer from Upper Stewiacke who was here at 5 a.m. just to help us,” she said. “Six was our starting time, and the representatives from the radio stations had a couple of bags for us at that time too.

“Everybody is working on their food bank. It’s the community’s food bank, and that’s not an exaggeration.”

The Truro Lions Club donated $5,000 to the cause, which was equivalent to 5,000 pounds of food. In addition, Scotia Bank matched donated $5,000 and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Colchester stopped by with a cheque for $500 from their supporters and volunteers.

“We’ve had large donations even from individuals this year,” she said.

In the run of a month, the food bank operates an average of 22 days. Within those 22 days, new clients are always coming in.

“We will get anywhere from 25 to about 47 in those 22 days. And sometimes we will get emergency calls through other organizations such as the Red Cross, the fire department or even churches.”

 

rtetanish@trurodaily.com

Twitter: @TDNRaissa

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