Mother Nature delivers winter wallop

Storm unloads more than 20 cm of snow in Truro

Joey Smith webcomments@ngnews.ca
Published on January 8, 2017

Bob Archibald shovels the steps of a Dominion Street business on Sunday after a storm dumped more than 20 cm of snow on Truro overnight Saturday. Archibald was one of many people who could be seen yesterday clearing walkways and driveways throughout town.

©Joey Smith/TC Media

TRURO, N.S. – Colchester County residents were digging out Sunday following a weekend snowstorm.

An Environment Canada auto station in Debert reported a snowfall amount of 20 cm overnight Saturday, while a volunteer observer in Truro reported 21.6 cm.

“We can probably get, on average, two of these types of storms a winter, so it’s pretty normal for this time of year,” said Barrie MacKinnon, meteorologist for Environment Canada. “Certainly a decent storm, but nothing too out of the ordinary for us.”

As much as 35 centimetres of snow fell over parts of Nova Scotia and P.E.I., while southeastern New Brunswick received about 25 centimetres.

Alex Levean was busy blowing snow on Sunday in Truro after a winter storm blanketed the region with more than 20 cm.
Joey Smith/TC Media

“We forecasted 30 to 40 centimetres, so for mainland Nova Scotia, that’s what they got,” MacKinnon said. “Some smaller amounts, like in the Truro area, with 20, but generally it behaved pretty well.”

Many flights at Halifax Stanfield International Airport were delayed or cancelled and most major roads in Nova Scotia were still snow-covered Sunday afternoon.

About 6,000 Nova Scotia Power customers were briefly in the dark Sunday, but that number dropped to about 200 by early afternoon.

P.E.I. remained under a winter storm warning Sunday afternoon, as high winds were expected to blow snow across roadways and create zero-visibility driving conditions.

Most of western Newfoundland was under a snowfall warning Sunday, with 20 centimetres expected by the afternoon before the snow changed to ice pellets and freezing rain.

– With Canadian Press files