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Warriors to play in honour of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls

The Mi’kmaq Warriors junior lacrosse team will wear patches on their jerseys for the remainder of the season to pay tribute to missing and murdered Indigenous women.
The Mi’kmaq Warriors junior lacrosse team will wear patches on their jerseys for the remainder of the season to pay tribute to missing and murdered Indigenous women. - Submitted

Friday’s East Coast Junior Lacrosse League game in Truro holds special meaning for not only the Mi’kmaq Warriors, but the community as a whole.

The Warriors will play the contest against the Halifax Hurricanes in honour of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

Game time at the Colchester Legion Stadium is 8 p.m.

“We’re just hoping for a huge turnout, that people in the Truro area and all around could come and support the team and see what the boys do for the community and for the Indigenous community,” said Warriors president Penny Raymond.

Admission to the game is by donation. All proceeds from the gate will go toward the local chapter of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

“It’s nice to give to such a great cause,” said Raymond. “For all of (the players) to step up and support this, and parents as well, and the community, it’s quite touching.

“If we can honour this event every year moving forward I think we’re doing something great.”

Red dresses will hang throughout the stadium Friday in honour of the women. Traditional Mi’kmaq dancing and drumming will also take place, and dignitaries from Millbrook and Sipekne’katik First Nations will also be on hand.

Sgt. Shari Pictou of the Truro Police Service will take part in the ceremonial faceoff.

“The spirit of these women are with our players that night,” said Raymond.

Marie Sack, a community support co-ordinator for the families of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, said the tribute will also bring more attention to the issue of violence against Indigenous women. 

“I think that’s so great of those young boys to do that,” she said.

“It’s very important. It’s so touching that they even thought about something like that. I find for that team to be doing that is such an honour for Indigenous women and girls.”

As a tribute to missing and murdered Indigenous women, the Warriors will wear patches on their jerseys for the remainder of the season.

One of the most high-profile cases of missing and murdered Indigenous women is that of Millbrook’s Tanya Brooks.

Tanya’s body was found May 11, 2009, in the basement window well of St. Patrick’s-Alexandra School on Maitland Street in Halifax. She was 36 years old and the mother of five.

Police are still searching for her killer.

Earlier this week, the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls received a six-month extension to complete its work. The inquiry was originally scheduled to submit its report on Nov. 1 and wrap up its operations by the end of December.

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