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Pictou-born woman reunited with brother after more than 50 years

Kathy and John are pictured together as children. The photo was given to her by relatives who she connected with by sending in her DNA to be tested on a genealogical site.
Kathy and John are pictured together as children. The photo was given to her by relatives who she connected with by sending in her DNA to be tested on a genealogical site. - Contributed

Kathy Ahmad has found her brother. 

About a week after The News first published Ahmad’s story about being separated from her brother as a child in Pictou, her brother made contact with Saltwire Media, which owns The News, to say he thought he was the John she was looking for. 

The man, who grew up with a family in the Halifax area, now lives in New Brunswick. On Nov. 22, Ahmad, who was raised with a family outside Toledo, Ohio, called him. Within minutes, she said they had exchanged enough information for her to know for sure it was her brother. Her brother even has a piece of paper with their mother’s name on it. 

For four hours, they talked and shared childhood memories. 

He described his memory of Ahmad as “always standing beside you and feeling I was safe there.” 

They have shared memories of a family home in Pictou. John shared about a wooden boat he remembers their biological father carving for him. 

He remembers being told that his sister had been adopted into the United States.  

“She’s gone to the States and you’ll never find her,” he was told. 

He knew nothing himself of the extended family that Ahmad has been able to track down in recent years. 

Already, Ahmad is looking at flights and hopes to be able to come visit her brother in the next couple weeks. She had another trip already booked for June, but doesn't have the patience to wait that long. 

“After all this, I can’t wait,” she said. 

Ahmad said she is thankful for those who shared her story, offered notes of encouragement and gave advice on where to look. 

“I was getting so many people sending me messages from all over Nova Scotia and Cape Breton.” 

She said the one thing she wishes she could change is the way that Nova Scotia handles adoption cases. To her, it doesn’t make sense for the government to prevent adults in their 60s who want to get in touch with each other from getting that information. 

“You can’t destroy people’s lives," she said. “An adoptive child always feels something’s missing in their life.” 

For her, she’s happy to say, what was missing has been found.  

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