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In the news today, Oct. 22


Eight stories in the news for Monday, Oct. 22

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CANADA POST HIT BY ROTATING STRIKES

The union representing 50,000 Canada Post employees has begun rotating strikes in four cities. The Canadian Union of Postal Workers says the 24-hour strikes began Monday at 12:01 a.m. local time in Victoria, Edmonton and Windsor, Ont., and at 1:01 a.m. in Halifax. The union says mail will still be delivered in those cities, but will be delayed. The job action began after negotiators failed to reach a new contract agreement before the union's Monday strike deadline.

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EARTHQUAKES REPORTED OFF VANCOUVER ISLAND 

Three strong earthquakes were reported Sunday night in the Pacific Ocean off Vancouver Island. The U.S. Geological Survey said a 6.6 magnitude quake was recorded about 260 kilometres west of Tofino, followed by a 6.8 tremor and then a third measuring 6.5 The quakes all occurred in the same general area over the course of about an hour, and at a shallow depth of approximately 10 kilometres. But no tsunami warning was issued and there were no reports of any damage.

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VOTERS HEAD TO POLLS FOR ONTARIO MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS

Voters across Ontario will cast their ballots in municipal elections today after a lead-up that's seen everything from legal battles to electoral reform. Much of the narrative has been dominated by Toronto, where 242 candidates are fighting for a spot on a sharply reduced 25-member council — down from the 47 seats they would have had if not for provincial interference. Hot button issues such as housing and accessible public transit have been hot campaign issues in Toronto and smaller municipalities alike.

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BRIDGES NOT WALLS KEY TO STEWART'S MAYORAL SUCCESS

On the heels of his narrow victory in Vancouver's mayoral race, observers say Kennedy Stewart's biggest challenge will be leading a council fractured across party lines as he tries to deliver on platform promises like increasing housing supply. The former NDP MP, who ran as an Independent, will lead 10 councillors divided across four parties with an even split between progressives and members of the right-leaning Non-Partisan Association. Vancouver is one of the few cities in Canada that operates on a party system.

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CANADA REVIEW DEEMED U.S. SAFE FOR ASYLUM SEEKERS

Canadian immigration officials have determined that the U.S. remains a safe country for asylum seekers, despite the Trump administration's crackdown on what it terms illegal aliens. Documents obtained by The Canadian Press under access-to-information law show Canada was concerned about the changes in U.S. immigration policy and conducted a review of its Safe Third Country agreement with the United States from January to March of 2017.

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ARCTIC POLITICIAN TO ASK FOR CIVILIAN RCMP OVERSIGHT

A Nunavut politician wants the territory to review how it investigates violence complaints against the RCMP. Adam Arreak Lightstone, a member of the legislature from Iqaluit, says he'll use the legislative sitting that begins Tuesday to demand Nunavut reconsider its police oversight. His concern stems from recently released documents and videos detailing complaints about RCMP use of force. The Ottawa and Calgary police forces currently investigate complaints against Nunavut Mounties. 

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BOMBARDIER SUES MITSUBISHI IN THE U.S.

Bombardier is suing Mitsubishi Aircraft in the U.S. over alleged trade secret misappropriation. The Quebec aerospace company alleges some of its own former employees passed on documents containing trade secrets to Mitsubishi before going to work for the company. The complaint filed in a Seattle court also targets Aerospace Testing Engineering & Certification (AeroTEC), which supports the Japanese multinational in the development of its MRJ airline, as well as several ex-Bombardier employees.

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TRUMP, TARIFFS LOOM LARGE OVER WTO MEETING

At first glance, it sounds like just another political gathering with a yawn-inducing agenda — dispute resolution systems and plurilateral solutions to the international trade and development nexus. But this week's two-day gathering in Ottawa on how to expedite World Trade Organization reform has as much to do with Donald Trump, job-killing global tariff wars and the countless would-be refugees trying to make their way to the United States as it does with plenaries, procurement and intellectual property.

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ALSO IN THE NEWS:

— Matthew Vincent Raymond, accused of killing four people including two city police officers is due back in Fredericton court.

— Re-trial for Dennis Oland on a charge of second-degree murder in the 2011 death of his father, Richard Oland in Saint John.

— Statistics Canada releases wholesale trade figures for August and investment in non-residential building construction for the third quarter.

— Toronto court appearance for alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur.

— New measures to help in the protection and recovery of endangered whale populations will be announced in Vancouver.

— Vancouver trial for Garry Handlen, accused of the first-degree murder of 12-year-old Monica Jack in May 1978.

The Canadian Press

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