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TRURO - For the past two years, Zach Julian has honed his snowboarding skills. This year, he’s hoping to help others do the same.

He spent the past two seasons enrolled in L’nu Kamakn Snowboard and Ski program.

“I already knew how to snowboard, but I wanted to do better,” said Julian, 21.

This year, the Millbrook man is passing along his knowledge in the role of instructor, along with two other locals, Bryson Knockwood and Stephen Johnson.

“This program expands your skills through building blocks. For example if you want to do a 180, they’ll start you with a hop and then a spin and so on. They build on it. That’s what really benefited me.”

The program, says Julian, takes participants back to the basics, building from the bottom up. He had been enjoying his time over the past seven years snowboarding, but wanted more.

The program, in its third year at three ski hills throughout the province, is open to members of the 13 Mi’kmaq communities in Nova Scotia. This year, there are 123 youth enrolled in the eight-week program, which incorporates elements of leadership and mentorship, while promoting a healthier lifestyle. Youth are also encouraged to continue on with certification to work on the ski hills. The Confederacy of Mainland Mi’kmaq facilitates the program and provides funding for certification.

Knockwood took on the instructor’s duties, after starting in the program two years ago.

“I skateboarded as a kid and had never snowboarded, but I’m the type of guy who has a drive and passion to try out different sports, and carry on with them,” said the 17-year-old. “I started it and just decided to stick with it. This year, I really want to develop my riding skills and add new tricks to my arsenal, and maybe do some competing.”

As for Julian, he has a passion for helping youth.

“I knew I wanted to be an instructor in the program. I help teach lacrosse and other sports, and I love helping kids,” said Julian. “I want to help out with the younger kids and help them develop their skills.”

While Julian himself doesn’t want to compete, he may get into boardercross, or racing, for fun.

“I have more of an interest in coaching than anything,” he said.

 

rtetanish@trurodaily.com

Twitter: @TDNRaissa

He spent the past two seasons enrolled in L’nu Kamakn Snowboard and Ski program.

“I already knew how to snowboard, but I wanted to do better,” said Julian, 21.

This year, the Millbrook man is passing along his knowledge in the role of instructor, along with two other locals, Bryson Knockwood and Stephen Johnson.

“This program expands your skills through building blocks. For example if you want to do a 180, they’ll start you with a hop and then a spin and so on. They build on it. That’s what really benefited me.”

The program, says Julian, takes participants back to the basics, building from the bottom up. He had been enjoying his time over the past seven years snowboarding, but wanted more.

The program, in its third year at three ski hills throughout the province, is open to members of the 13 Mi’kmaq communities in Nova Scotia. This year, there are 123 youth enrolled in the eight-week program, which incorporates elements of leadership and mentorship, while promoting a healthier lifestyle. Youth are also encouraged to continue on with certification to work on the ski hills. The Confederacy of Mainland Mi’kmaq facilitates the program and provides funding for certification.

Knockwood took on the instructor’s duties, after starting in the program two years ago.

“I skateboarded as a kid and had never snowboarded, but I’m the type of guy who has a drive and passion to try out different sports, and carry on with them,” said the 17-year-old. “I started it and just decided to stick with it. This year, I really want to develop my riding skills and add new tricks to my arsenal, and maybe do some competing.”

As for Julian, he has a passion for helping youth.

“I knew I wanted to be an instructor in the program. I help teach lacrosse and other sports, and I love helping kids,” said Julian. “I want to help out with the younger kids and help them develop their skills.”

While Julian himself doesn’t want to compete, he may get into boardercross, or racing, for fun.

“I have more of an interest in coaching than anything,” he said.

 

rtetanish@trurodaily.com

Twitter: @TDNRaissa

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