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Gorringe helps lead UNB to national silver in rookie year


FREDERICTON, N.B. – After the best and most exhausting week of his life, Ben Gorringe arrived back at school on Monday and re-entered the real world.

Heading to a Monday class is never an easy task, but it was even harder coming off an emotional roller coaster at the Canadian Interuniversity Sport soccer nationals. The Truro native had been a workhorse, a hero, a winner and a loser while riding an incredible wave for 96 hours in Toronto.

Gorringe and his University of New Brunswick teammates had fallen just short of a perfect run, falling to the host York University team and earning a silver medal.

“I don’t think it’s sunk in yet, even with the silver medal here,” he said. “I don’t think it will sink in for a long time.”

While it’s not hard to believe the second-seeded Varsity Reds laid claim to a silver medal, Gorringe’s role at nationals is what leaves him wondering if it was all a dream. The rookie midfielder had started eight of 13 games in the regular season, scoring two goals along the way. Coming off three years as arguably the best player in Cobequid Educational Centre history, it was a massive difference in production and playing time. But that changed at nationals, where he started the first game – a quarterfinal matchup with seventh-seeded University of Victoria. Down 2-1 with less than five minutes to play, the Reds entire season was in doubt. That’s when Gorringe picked up a loose ball at the 18-yard line and booted a perfect shot around a defender and just inside the far post. Tie game.

Less than three minutes later, teammate Kenneth Van aarle scored to give UNB their first and final lead of the game. Gorringe was named the game’s most-valuable player.

That chance is something Gorringe is used to – he’s not sure if it’s luck or something else, but the ball seems to end up at his feet in key moments. But he didn’t expect to make such an impact in his first season after high school.

“The coach told me my minutes would be, not limited, but less than I was used to,” he said. “I went into the preseason and just showed what I could do and proved myself throughout the season. The CIS (nationals), that’s when I played the most and when the coach had the most confidence in me.”

When the Reds defeated Quebec to reach the finals, Gorringe couldn’t help but think of his Cougars teammates and how they’d fallen short of a provincial final during his three years. They settled for bronze twice, in 2012 and 2013.

“We’ve been there together a few times before, falling short of the big game,” he said of his former team. “There’s definitely a few teammates I wish could have been there for this.”

His only other wish is for their medal to be a different colour the next time around.

“Seeing them celebrating with their gold medals is something that’s burned into our memories forever. We want to get back there next year and for that to be us.”

As for the quarterfinals, it’s a game and a goal he won’t soon forget.

“I’ll remember that one for the rest of my life.”

 

Heading to a Monday class is never an easy task, but it was even harder coming off an emotional roller coaster at the Canadian Interuniversity Sport soccer nationals. The Truro native had been a workhorse, a hero, a winner and a loser while riding an incredible wave for 96 hours in Toronto.

Gorringe and his University of New Brunswick teammates had fallen just short of a perfect run, falling to the host York University team and earning a silver medal.

“I don’t think it’s sunk in yet, even with the silver medal here,” he said. “I don’t think it will sink in for a long time.”

While it’s not hard to believe the second-seeded Varsity Reds laid claim to a silver medal, Gorringe’s role at nationals is what leaves him wondering if it was all a dream. The rookie midfielder had started eight of 13 games in the regular season, scoring two goals along the way. Coming off three years as arguably the best player in Cobequid Educational Centre history, it was a massive difference in production and playing time. But that changed at nationals, where he started the first game – a quarterfinal matchup with seventh-seeded University of Victoria. Down 2-1 with less than five minutes to play, the Reds entire season was in doubt. That’s when Gorringe picked up a loose ball at the 18-yard line and booted a perfect shot around a defender and just inside the far post. Tie game.

Less than three minutes later, teammate Kenneth Van aarle scored to give UNB their first and final lead of the game. Gorringe was named the game’s most-valuable player.

That chance is something Gorringe is used to – he’s not sure if it’s luck or something else, but the ball seems to end up at his feet in key moments. But he didn’t expect to make such an impact in his first season after high school.

“The coach told me my minutes would be, not limited, but less than I was used to,” he said. “I went into the preseason and just showed what I could do and proved myself throughout the season. The CIS (nationals), that’s when I played the most and when the coach had the most confidence in me.”

When the Reds defeated Quebec to reach the finals, Gorringe couldn’t help but think of his Cougars teammates and how they’d fallen short of a provincial final during his three years. They settled for bronze twice, in 2012 and 2013.

“We’ve been there together a few times before, falling short of the big game,” he said of his former team. “There’s definitely a few teammates I wish could have been there for this.”

His only other wish is for their medal to be a different colour the next time around.

“Seeing them celebrating with their gold medals is something that’s burned into our memories forever. We want to get back there next year and for that to be us.”

As for the quarterfinals, it’s a game and a goal he won’t soon forget.

“I’ll remember that one for the rest of my life.”

 

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