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Golfing for a great cause


TRURO – Mark Shelley stepped up to the ball to pose for a picture as his playing mates mocked him on the 18th hole.

“This is perfect. He’s been pretending to sink putts all day.”

Shelley and his buddies gathered for a round of handshakes after finishing the final hole at Truro Golf Club on Thursday to wrap up the Colchester Community Workshops Foundation Golf Classic.

“Good round fellas,” Ryan Gillcash said to the others. “What a day, what a day.”

And what a fundraiser, too.

In the 14-year history of the tournament, organizer Diane Standing can’t recall a total as high as this one.

Shortly after 1 p.m., with most golfers still out on the course and the silent auction and 50/50 not yet complete, Standing couldn’t wipe the smile off her face. After tallying up the registration and other numbers throughout the morning, they were already at $32,000 – higher than the previous year’s total by nearly four grand.

“It’s amazing,” she said, working away at last-minute jobs before the golfers came in and the banquet began.

By 3 p.m., the total was in and the smile on her face had become permanent and her eyes were permanently watering happy tears.

All totalled, the Colchester Community Workshops Foundation walked away from the event with $35,141.

“I’m just proud of everybody,” she said wiping her eyes. “The support of the community is just fantastic. We couldn’t do it without everybody and the support we have. It’s a testament to how well thought of the workshops are in the community.”

On the winning team this year was Paul Clark, the chairman of this year’s tournament. Clark, alongside Derek Forsyth, Peter Fahey and Wayne Talbot, took home top spot in the first division.

“It was pretty equal all the way through (the team),” Clark said. “A couple guys weren’t there for their good looks though, let’s just say that.”

Clark got involved with CCWF through his business partner, Greg Johnston, whose daughter has special needs. Johnston “voluntold” him to join the foundation, and this year he chaired the tournament for the first time.

“It was nice to come back this year and actually win the tournament, and then to raise an enormous amount of funds, too,” Clark said. “That’s the main thing. (The golf) is fun, but that’s the thing that grabs my heart.”

The money gained will go towards a capital campaign to repair a storage building roof collapse from February, as well as any other projects the CCWF takes part in.

Is it safe to call it Standing’s favourite day of the year?

“Absolutely. Especially when it’s over,” she laughed. “It’s a lot of work, but we’ve got a great committee and a great foundation board and all the clients come out to help out and it’s just the best feeling. What a beautiful day.”

 

 

@TDNryan

ryan.cooke@trurodaily.com

 

 

“This is perfect. He’s been pretending to sink putts all day.”

Shelley and his buddies gathered for a round of handshakes after finishing the final hole at Truro Golf Club on Thursday to wrap up the Colchester Community Workshops Foundation Golf Classic.

“Good round fellas,” Ryan Gillcash said to the others. “What a day, what a day.”

And what a fundraiser, too.

In the 14-year history of the tournament, organizer Diane Standing can’t recall a total as high as this one.

Shortly after 1 p.m., with most golfers still out on the course and the silent auction and 50/50 not yet complete, Standing couldn’t wipe the smile off her face. After tallying up the registration and other numbers throughout the morning, they were already at $32,000 – higher than the previous year’s total by nearly four grand.

“It’s amazing,” she said, working away at last-minute jobs before the golfers came in and the banquet began.

By 3 p.m., the total was in and the smile on her face had become permanent and her eyes were permanently watering happy tears.

All totalled, the Colchester Community Workshops Foundation walked away from the event with $35,141.

“I’m just proud of everybody,” she said wiping her eyes. “The support of the community is just fantastic. We couldn’t do it without everybody and the support we have. It’s a testament to how well thought of the workshops are in the community.”

On the winning team this year was Paul Clark, the chairman of this year’s tournament. Clark, alongside Derek Forsyth, Peter Fahey and Wayne Talbot, took home top spot in the first division.

“It was pretty equal all the way through (the team),” Clark said. “A couple guys weren’t there for their good looks though, let’s just say that.”

Clark got involved with CCWF through his business partner, Greg Johnston, whose daughter has special needs. Johnston “voluntold” him to join the foundation, and this year he chaired the tournament for the first time.

“It was nice to come back this year and actually win the tournament, and then to raise an enormous amount of funds, too,” Clark said. “That’s the main thing. (The golf) is fun, but that’s the thing that grabs my heart.”

The money gained will go towards a capital campaign to repair a storage building roof collapse from February, as well as any other projects the CCWF takes part in.

Is it safe to call it Standing’s favourite day of the year?

“Absolutely. Especially when it’s over,” she laughed. “It’s a lot of work, but we’ve got a great committee and a great foundation board and all the clients come out to help out and it’s just the best feeling. What a beautiful day.”

 

 

@TDNryan

ryan.cooke@trurodaily.com

 

 

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