Young students learn the importance of Earth Day

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Earth Day has taken on a new meaning for many young children at Shubenacadie District Elementary School.

About 100 students from Grades Primary to 3 spent some time at the Glooscap Heritage Centre in Millbrook on Wednesday to celebrate Earth Day. Although the designated day was Tuesday, there were numerous activities taking place at the centre and five-year-old Trinity Googoo was thrilled with the new things she learned about the environment.

“It’s important not to litter because the earth will get junky,” the Grade Primary student told the Truro Daily News.

“And I learned about recycling and to put food in the green bin and to recycle pop cans and put French fries in the compost,” the youngster proudly said.

Trinity also recognizes the importance of having clean rivers and water.

“It’s important to keep water clean so it doesn’t get garbage in it. It would be bad if garbage got in water because things in it like crabs, dolphins, sharks and octopus would die … that would make me sad.”

The students were treated to many activities at the centre yesterday, including drumming and singing, time in the centre’s theatre and speaking with experts in recycling, conservation and agriculture, to name a few.

“I learned compost turns into dirt,” said six-year-old Josh MacPhee of the day trip, adding he helps “put all the cans in bags at home.”

The students’ teacher, Nicki Eikelenboom, was impressed with the event.

“It’s really important to learn at a young age … we only have one earth and we need to protect it and the children are eager to learn,” said Eikelenboom. “It’s good to expose (knowledge) to them early so it becomes second nature.”

Grade 3 student Rebeka Julian took the opportunity to learn about conservation of fish, particularly Atlantic salmon.

“I’ve been learning a lot of stuff ... we need to protect some fish because there are not a lot of them,” said Rebeka.

“And we need animals for food,” so they need to be healthy, she added.

Clayton Coppaway, a resource and education officer with the Millbrook-based Mi’kmaw Conservation Group, was encouraged to witness the children learning and taking an interest.

“We are creating positive messages and encouraging lifelong lessons. The idea is, ‘even a little thing I do can to help makes a big difference’ (especially) if enough people do them,” said Coppaway.

Darlyne Proctor, a waste reduction manager with Colchester County, was also pleased with the children’s interest in recycling and earth management.

“They are stewards of our world. They are learning to respect the earth and hopefully they will take these messages with them,” said Proctor.  

mchiasson@trurodaily.com

Twitter: tdnMonique

Did you know?

-       41 per cent of people think the environment is important, but not the most important issue 

-       Seniors are least likely to believe global warming is a threat, with 29 per cent saying it is not  



-       Women are more supportive of plastic bag bans, with 45 per cent  supporting such an initiative, citing it helps change people’s habits 

-       Generation Y, or people born between the mid-1970s to 2000, is best at carpooling, biking, and using public transportation. 

-       Baby boomers are best at: recycling, composting, and using reusable shopping bags. 



-       Seniors are best at: recycling, purchasing green products, planting trees, driving hybrids, and all-around supporting the environment

 

* These fun facts, and others, can be found online through Infographic Environmental Habits at  http://www.tada.com/blog/infographic-environmental-habits-across-generations/

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Earth Day has taken on a new meaning for many young children at Shubenacadie District Elementary School.

An estimated 100 students from Grades Primary to … spent some time at the Glooscap … Centre in Millbrook on Wednesday to celebrate Earth Day. Although the designated day was Tuesday, there were numerous activities taking place at the centre and five-year-old Trinity Googoo was thrilled with the new things she learned about the environment.

“It’s important not to litter because the earth will get junky,” said Grade Primary student told the Truro Daily News.

“And I learned about recycling and to put food in the green bin and to recycle pop cans and put French fries in the compost,” the youngster proudly said.

Trinity also recognizes the importance of having clean rivers and water.

“Its’ important to keep water clean so it doesn’t get garbage in it. It would be bad if garbage got in water because things in it like crabs, dolphins, shark and octopus would die … that would make me sad.”

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