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Middle school students celebrate accomplishments on local, global scale


VALLEY - There was no hesitation in Sarah Welton's voice when admitting she wants to continue as a World Changer.

"It's just so good," said the 10-year-old, Grade 5 student at Redcliff Middle School as a mini We Day was wrapping up. "My mom went to a meeting and they were talking about so many disadvantages that people have. I wanted to join this, and I already help out at the local shelter."

World Changers started at the middle school earlier this year under the direction of teachers Steve Fultz and Tammy Chitty, with 38 students initially joining the group.

"We got involved in a Me to We initiative and started working to solve global and local issues," said Fultz. "Through the World Changers, we created awareness about the issues and raised money."

Of the $4,000 students raised, $600 went to the Truro Homeless Outreach Society's permanent shelter, dubbed Hub House; $2,400 was raised for a ‘We Are Silent' initiative through Free the Children, and another $1,000 was raised for clean water initiatives.

"We wanted to have a mini We Day to celebrate the work they've done so far, and to inspire others to get involved next year," the teacher said.

"It's important for the students to realize they can make an impact, can make a change on those issues, and make them more aware of how lucky they are."

Fultz said staff at the school are "really pleased" with students, especially because it started as an exploratory program. The plan is to continue it next year, and opening it to all students, not just those in exploratory.

"It was all through the children," explained Fultz. "They were constantly pushing up. Their enthusiasm and energy was great."

The World Changers also worked with staff from RBC Royal Bank to help clean up garbage behind the school.

"We were all shocked," said Sarah about the clean up. "We saw what looked like illegal dumpsites. It was shocking to realize that kids and other people could be treating our school like that."

During the school's We Day, students heard from various speakers, including Michael Pinto, on the Guatemala Outreach Project, Cheryl MacLeod from the homeless outreach society, and others.

"I just like helping others," said Sarah. "I was surprised to learn how disadvantaged people are, and how lucky Canada is. I'm always surprised if people don't want to stay here (in Canada), because there are people around the world that want to live here. They say we are the nicest country and the people are so helpful and happy."

rtetanish@trurodaily.com

Twitter: @TDNRaissa

 

"It's just so good," said the 10-year-old, Grade 5 student at Redcliff Middle School as a mini We Day was wrapping up. "My mom went to a meeting and they were talking about so many disadvantages that people have. I wanted to join this, and I already help out at the local shelter."

World Changers started at the middle school earlier this year under the direction of teachers Steve Fultz and Tammy Chitty, with 38 students initially joining the group.

"We got involved in a Me to We initiative and started working to solve global and local issues," said Fultz. "Through the World Changers, we created awareness about the issues and raised money."

Of the $4,000 students raised, $600 went to the Truro Homeless Outreach Society's permanent shelter, dubbed Hub House; $2,400 was raised for a ‘We Are Silent' initiative through Free the Children, and another $1,000 was raised for clean water initiatives.

"We wanted to have a mini We Day to celebrate the work they've done so far, and to inspire others to get involved next year," the teacher said.

"It's important for the students to realize they can make an impact, can make a change on those issues, and make them more aware of how lucky they are."

Fultz said staff at the school are "really pleased" with students, especially because it started as an exploratory program. The plan is to continue it next year, and opening it to all students, not just those in exploratory.

"It was all through the children," explained Fultz. "They were constantly pushing up. Their enthusiasm and energy was great."

The World Changers also worked with staff from RBC Royal Bank to help clean up garbage behind the school.

"We were all shocked," said Sarah about the clean up. "We saw what looked like illegal dumpsites. It was shocking to realize that kids and other people could be treating our school like that."

During the school's We Day, students heard from various speakers, including Michael Pinto, on the Guatemala Outreach Project, Cheryl MacLeod from the homeless outreach society, and others.

"I just like helping others," said Sarah. "I was surprised to learn how disadvantaged people are, and how lucky Canada is. I'm always surprised if people don't want to stay here (in Canada), because there are people around the world that want to live here. They say we are the nicest country and the people are so helpful and happy."

rtetanish@trurodaily.com

Twitter: @TDNRaissa

 

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