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Local residents with Scottish roots debate Scotland’s independent vote


TRURO – Colchester County residents with Scottish roots are keeping a close eye on their homeland’s independent vote Thursday.

Scotland will vote on Thursday to decide if it wants to become an independent nation after more than three centuries of union with the United Kingdom.

Brule’s Bill Todd, 73, was born in Glasgow, Scotland and has been watching the independence debate unfold in his homeland. He hopes the final vote is to remain status quo.

“I have a feeling it will be a very, very close vote with a no (result) … probably because we are a stubborn people,” said Todd.

“I’m sitting on the fence. I hear there are a lot of undecided voters and I would be too. I’d probably vote ‘no’ because the status quo is easier and … and all hell would break loose,” if Scotland separated, he said.

“Scots are more interested in people than money. Money is more important in England.” 

Todd, who moved to Canada in 1960 and to Brule in 1973, said his Scottish memories run deep.

“I remember as a kid on the playground asking each other which country we liked the best. It was always Scotland over England. It was a mindset even back then … it’s always been on the back burner there.”

Todd said it’s important for people with Scottish roots to pay attention to the vote.

“We are not removed and we have many generations of Scots here.”

Truro’s Ron Robertson, 81, was born in Aberdeen, Scotland.

A local resident since 1966, Robertson believes Scotland should become an independent nation.

“It’s a good idea. It would be like if Canada and the United States” were in this situation. “How would we like being governed mostly from Washington?”

Robertson said London holds the most power now but Scotland is more than capable of sustaining itself.

“You have to be able to feed and (sustain) yourself and Scotland can” with its oil, gas, farming and fishing trades, Robertson said.

“Each individual will be better off (but) people are scared of change and have a sense of tradition,” he said.

According to media and website reports this week, rallies on both sides occurred throughout Scotland last weekend. Analysts said the referendum was too close to call. Scotland’s population is 5.3 million compared to 64.1 million for Great Britain as a whole.

According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_independence, reasons in favour of independence include Scotland's population would possess full decision-making power of its nation; it  could address removal of Trident nuclear weapons; and it could fully utilize financial benefits of its national resources. Reasons cited in favour of maintaining the union include strong cultural, economic, and family links with the UK; Scotland's levels of public spending would be difficult to sustain after independence without raising taxes; Scotland has more influence on international affairs as part of the union; and outlying regions would be disadvantaged regarding oil revenue.

 

mchiasson@trurodaily.com

Twitter: tdnMonique

 

Scotland will vote on Thursday to decide if it wants to become an independent nation after more than three centuries of union with the United Kingdom.

Brule’s Bill Todd, 73, was born in Glasgow, Scotland and has been watching the independence debate unfold in his homeland. He hopes the final vote is to remain status quo.

“I have a feeling it will be a very, very close vote with a no (result) … probably because we are a stubborn people,” said Todd.

“I’m sitting on the fence. I hear there are a lot of undecided voters and I would be too. I’d probably vote ‘no’ because the status quo is easier and … and all hell would break loose,” if Scotland separated, he said.

“Scots are more interested in people than money. Money is more important in England.” 

Todd, who moved to Canada in 1960 and to Brule in 1973, said his Scottish memories run deep.

“I remember as a kid on the playground asking each other which country we liked the best. It was always Scotland over England. It was a mindset even back then … it’s always been on the back burner there.”

Todd said it’s important for people with Scottish roots to pay attention to the vote.

“We are not removed and we have many generations of Scots here.”

Truro’s Ron Robertson, 81, was born in Aberdeen, Scotland.

A local resident since 1966, Robertson believes Scotland should become an independent nation.

“It’s a good idea. It would be like if Canada and the United States” were in this situation. “How would we like being governed mostly from Washington?”

Robertson said London holds the most power now but Scotland is more than capable of sustaining itself.

“You have to be able to feed and (sustain) yourself and Scotland can” with its oil, gas, farming and fishing trades, Robertson said.

“Each individual will be better off (but) people are scared of change and have a sense of tradition,” he said.

According to media and website reports this week, rallies on both sides occurred throughout Scotland last weekend. Analysts said the referendum was too close to call. Scotland’s population is 5.3 million compared to 64.1 million for Great Britain as a whole.

According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_independence, reasons in favour of independence include Scotland's population would possess full decision-making power of its nation; it  could address removal of Trident nuclear weapons; and it could fully utilize financial benefits of its national resources. Reasons cited in favour of maintaining the union include strong cultural, economic, and family links with the UK; Scotland's levels of public spending would be difficult to sustain after independence without raising taxes; Scotland has more influence on international affairs as part of the union; and outlying regions would be disadvantaged regarding oil revenue.

 

mchiasson@trurodaily.com

Twitter: tdnMonique

 

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