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Local residents rewarded for their dedication to heritage preservation


TRURO – Shirley Brinkhurst was still a little surprised to be accepting an award as she approached the podium in her elegant, black Victorian dress.

“While I can do it, I’ll always be involved. I’ll cherish it,” Brinkhurst, 81, of Tatamgouche, said as she accepted a 2015 silver Maple Leaf coin from the Royal Canadian Mint during Heritage Night on Thursday.

The annual event is hosted by the Colchester Historical Society and celebrates contributions to the preservation and promotion of the history of Colchester County. About 60 people were in attendance at the Colchester Historeum in Truro.

Brinkhurst’s award was for her volunteerism with the Margaret Fawcett Norrie Heritage Centre in Tatamagouche. She has been instrumental in many ways, including developing educational activities, implementing a student volunteer program, assisting fundraising and special events, and completing online exhibits, to name only a few projects.

“It’s a surprise and an honour to get this award. It’s strange to be awarded for something you enjoy doing,” Brinkhurst, who has been volunteering with the heritage centre for about seven years, told the Truro Daily News.

Brinkhurst added Heritage Night is an appropriate way to show “appreciation of what volunteers do.”

Judy Lewis, 73, of Bass River, was presented an award for her contributions to the Bass River Heritage Society and Museum.

“I feel honoured. I was born and brought up in Bass River and history and genealogy are my interests. I like the challenge of unearthing bits of history,” Lewis, who’s volunteered with the group since 1999, shared with this paper.

Since the late 1990s, she has helped run the museum in numerous ways, including completing extensive genealogical research on local families, contributing to the collection of historic images, and guiding tours for families looking for gravesites.

Lewis said it’s important for local residents to embrace the area’s history.

“Some local people have never been in (the museum). They’d be surprised at the number of artifacts and photos there are,” she said. “If we don’t (preserve) our history, it’s lost and too much has been lost.”

“Much of our history is told in photos and it’s important we value those, treasure them, and do our utmost to identify the people or events or places that are in those,” Lewis said in her speech.

Heritage Night also included the presentation of Built Heritage grants, which are given to property owners who completed work on their historic buildings. Recipients were

Truro residents Roger Yorke, Meaghan and Mark Denholm, Pam Tonary and Glenn MacKinnon.

 

mchiasson@trurodaily.com

Twitter: tdnMonique

 

“While I can do it, I’ll always be involved. I’ll cherish it,” Brinkhurst, 81, of Tatamgouche, said as she accepted a 2015 silver Maple Leaf coin from the Royal Canadian Mint during Heritage Night on Thursday.

The annual event is hosted by the Colchester Historical Society and celebrates contributions to the preservation and promotion of the history of Colchester County. About 60 people were in attendance at the Colchester Historeum in Truro.

Brinkhurst’s award was for her volunteerism with the Margaret Fawcett Norrie Heritage Centre in Tatamagouche. She has been instrumental in many ways, including developing educational activities, implementing a student volunteer program, assisting fundraising and special events, and completing online exhibits, to name only a few projects.

“It’s a surprise and an honour to get this award. It’s strange to be awarded for something you enjoy doing,” Brinkhurst, who has been volunteering with the heritage centre for about seven years, told the Truro Daily News.

Brinkhurst added Heritage Night is an appropriate way to show “appreciation of what volunteers do.”

Judy Lewis, 73, of Bass River, was presented an award for her contributions to the Bass River Heritage Society and Museum.

“I feel honoured. I was born and brought up in Bass River and history and genealogy are my interests. I like the challenge of unearthing bits of history,” Lewis, who’s volunteered with the group since 1999, shared with this paper.

Since the late 1990s, she has helped run the museum in numerous ways, including completing extensive genealogical research on local families, contributing to the collection of historic images, and guiding tours for families looking for gravesites.

Lewis said it’s important for local residents to embrace the area’s history.

“Some local people have never been in (the museum). They’d be surprised at the number of artifacts and photos there are,” she said. “If we don’t (preserve) our history, it’s lost and too much has been lost.”

“Much of our history is told in photos and it’s important we value those, treasure them, and do our utmost to identify the people or events or places that are in those,” Lewis said in her speech.

Heritage Night also included the presentation of Built Heritage grants, which are given to property owners who completed work on their historic buildings. Recipients were

Truro residents Roger Yorke, Meaghan and Mark Denholm, Pam Tonary and Glenn MacKinnon.

 

mchiasson@trurodaily.com

Twitter: tdnMonique

 

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