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Local area continues to get pummeled by snow


TRURO - Heard the news? Only one more day till spring.

Yeah right. Big ha ha, eh. Not even a good early April Fool's joke.

Want some more news? Winter's not done messing with us yet.

Spring officially begins in our area at 7:46 p.m. on Friday but one glance outside is enough to tell you that in reality, it's certainly not around the next corner.

And the long-term prediction offered by Environment Canada meteorologist Linda Libby on Wednesday offered no greater promise.

"Hi Linda, how are you today?" a reporter asked, while seeking some weather-related info.

"Enjoying the fun weather that I think you're getting as well," she replied, with a chuckle, from her office in Charlottetown.

"Well, I'm glad you're enjoying it (no chuckle)," a snarky reporter responded.

"That was a little sarcasm but I think we've all resorted to that by now," Libby said. "We're getting a little fatigued with it."

Fatigued or not, Libby predicted we can look forward to the chance of flurries continuing into Thursday and with a further possibility of additional snow over the weekend (although that could change to rain).

(And, an aside, the Old Farmer's Almanac is predicting periods of snow at least into mid April).

Further, Libby said, Environment Canada is predicting colder-than-normal temperatures over the next three months, with the greatest possibility of that occurring in April.

So far this winter, Libby said, the Truro area has received 214.8 centimetres (84.5 inches) of snow. (For sports buffs, that's about the height of Shaquille O'Neal.)

That was only up to Monday and does not include what the area received over the past two days.

The average winter snowfall for the Truro region over the past 30 years is 214.7 cm, she said, but that is right through until the last snowfall of the season, which for this year is still well over the horizon.

"You've still got about a month and a half to go yet," Libby said.

As of Monday the remaining on-ground-snow accumulation at the automatic weather station in Debert was recorded as 113 cm.

The previous record snow-depth accumulation from that site was on March 11, 1986, Libby said, which was recorded at 63 cm.

"So right now it does look like this year will be significantly higher."

Truro resident Kelly Burgess, who struggled to keep up with the falling snow as she shoveled her driveway on Wednesday, had two words to describe the latest storm.

"It's daunting," she said. "And I love a good snowstorm but this one did fill me with a bit of dread."

Not only because of the shoveling she had to do, Burgess said, but because it forced her to miss a day of work.

"The ironic thing is I work at a ski hill and we had to close."

David Leger, a sidewalk plow driver for the Town of Truro, said he has been working 16-hour shifts to try to keep abreast of the ever-accumulating snow.

"Oh, this is unbelievable this winter. This is the worst winter I ever seen," he said. "White Juan, it was here, it came all in one day. This here just keeps coming every night. Building up and building up. I got nowhere to blow it. It keeps coming back down behind me.

Despite the long shifts and unrelenting conditions, however, Leger said some residents are not exactly appreciative of his efforts.

"I had a lady give me a finger the other day because I pulled out of a blind driveway. So anyway, the next day she was standing out at her driveway and she apologized for giving me the finger," he said.

"That's alright, I said, I have had shovels thrown at me (after plugging up a driveway), a finger ain't nothing."

But with nowhere else for the snow to go, Leger said, things are pretty much out of his control.

"I ain't God. I can't send it back up," he said.

hsullivan@trurodaily,com

Twitter: @tdnharry

 

 

Yeah right. Big ha ha, eh. Not even a good early April Fool's joke.

Want some more news? Winter's not done messing with us yet.

Spring officially begins in our area at 7:46 p.m. on Friday but one glance outside is enough to tell you that in reality, it's certainly not around the next corner.

And the long-term prediction offered by Environment Canada meteorologist Linda Libby on Wednesday offered no greater promise.

"Hi Linda, how are you today?" a reporter asked, while seeking some weather-related info.

"Enjoying the fun weather that I think you're getting as well," she replied, with a chuckle, from her office in Charlottetown.

"Well, I'm glad you're enjoying it (no chuckle)," a snarky reporter responded.

"That was a little sarcasm but I think we've all resorted to that by now," Libby said. "We're getting a little fatigued with it."

Fatigued or not, Libby predicted we can look forward to the chance of flurries continuing into Thursday and with a further possibility of additional snow over the weekend (although that could change to rain).

(And, an aside, the Old Farmer's Almanac is predicting periods of snow at least into mid April).

Further, Libby said, Environment Canada is predicting colder-than-normal temperatures over the next three months, with the greatest possibility of that occurring in April.

So far this winter, Libby said, the Truro area has received 214.8 centimetres (84.5 inches) of snow. (For sports buffs, that's about the height of Shaquille O'Neal.)

That was only up to Monday and does not include what the area received over the past two days.

The average winter snowfall for the Truro region over the past 30 years is 214.7 cm, she said, but that is right through until the last snowfall of the season, which for this year is still well over the horizon.

"You've still got about a month and a half to go yet," Libby said.

As of Monday the remaining on-ground-snow accumulation at the automatic weather station in Debert was recorded as 113 cm.

The previous record snow-depth accumulation from that site was on March 11, 1986, Libby said, which was recorded at 63 cm.

"So right now it does look like this year will be significantly higher."

Truro resident Kelly Burgess, who struggled to keep up with the falling snow as she shoveled her driveway on Wednesday, had two words to describe the latest storm.

"It's daunting," she said. "And I love a good snowstorm but this one did fill me with a bit of dread."

Not only because of the shoveling she had to do, Burgess said, but because it forced her to miss a day of work.

"The ironic thing is I work at a ski hill and we had to close."

David Leger, a sidewalk plow driver for the Town of Truro, said he has been working 16-hour shifts to try to keep abreast of the ever-accumulating snow.

"Oh, this is unbelievable this winter. This is the worst winter I ever seen," he said. "White Juan, it was here, it came all in one day. This here just keeps coming every night. Building up and building up. I got nowhere to blow it. It keeps coming back down behind me.

Despite the long shifts and unrelenting conditions, however, Leger said some residents are not exactly appreciative of his efforts.

"I had a lady give me a finger the other day because I pulled out of a blind driveway. So anyway, the next day she was standing out at her driveway and she apologized for giving me the finger," he said.

"That's alright, I said, I have had shovels thrown at me (after plugging up a driveway), a finger ain't nothing."

But with nowhere else for the snow to go, Leger said, things are pretty much out of his control.

"I ain't God. I can't send it back up," he said.

hsullivan@trurodaily,com

Twitter: @tdnharry

 

 

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