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Living with a love for cars


TRURO – Andrew King remembers the day he turned eight years old.

As a young boy, he was upset his father left in his 1967 Ford Custom and wouldn’t take him with him. But little did he know his father was on his way to Amherst to buy his birthday present – a new bicycle.

That’s one of the memories that popped into the Debert man’s mind as he stood in front of his own 1967 Ford Custom at the annual show and shine held this past weekend at the Colchester Legion Stadium.

“I haven’t had this one for very long, only for a couple of years now,” said King, with his wife, Kimberly standing by his side. “It’s the same as the one my dad had. I’ve had to do very little work to this one.”

King purchased the blue car from the president of the Golden Age Auto Club, the host of the 33rd annual antique car show.

“I had a 1970 1/2 Camaro that I restored completely. It’s in Germany now,” said King, adding people told him it would take three years for him to restore. “I did it in six months.”

He laughed when he said his obsessive compulsive disorder helped restore the Camaro as quickly as he did.

“I was just born loving cars. And it helps when your wife loves them and supports you too.”

Inside King’s Ford Custom, he keeps the exact owner’s manual his father had when he purchased his car from the Casey family in Amherst. The manual has his father’s name in it.

Just after taking a picture of King standing in front of the Ford Custom, Kimberly said she never thought her interest in cars would be as deep as it is.

“It’s appealing. There are so many different models, styles and colours. When he’s restoring cars, I’m right along with him hunting for those parts,” she said.

“The hunt for the little pieces is almost as nice as having the car done itself,” King added.

With Saturday’s portion of the car show rained out, the Kings were delighted to see a constant stream of onlookers walking between the rows and stopping to look at each vehicle.

Doing just that was Jason Selkirk, of Truro, with his two sons, Ethan, 8, and six-year-old Colby.

“Their grandfathers are both car enthusiasts so we came down to talk to them and see the rest of the cars,” said Selkirk. “There are always a couple of really fancy cars here, and then the usuals.”

The younger of the two boys said he’s not a huge fan of cars, but Ethan smiled wide when asked about his favourite car of the show, which happened to be a Camaro SS inside the stadium.

“They’re fancy,” he said.

“The fancier the better, right?” asked Selkirk.

 

rtetanish@trurodaily.com

Twitter: @TDNRaissa

As a young boy, he was upset his father left in his 1967 Ford Custom and wouldn’t take him with him. But little did he know his father was on his way to Amherst to buy his birthday present – a new bicycle.

That’s one of the memories that popped into the Debert man’s mind as he stood in front of his own 1967 Ford Custom at the annual show and shine held this past weekend at the Colchester Legion Stadium.

“I haven’t had this one for very long, only for a couple of years now,” said King, with his wife, Kimberly standing by his side. “It’s the same as the one my dad had. I’ve had to do very little work to this one.”

King purchased the blue car from the president of the Golden Age Auto Club, the host of the 33rd annual antique car show.

“I had a 1970 1/2 Camaro that I restored completely. It’s in Germany now,” said King, adding people told him it would take three years for him to restore. “I did it in six months.”

He laughed when he said his obsessive compulsive disorder helped restore the Camaro as quickly as he did.

“I was just born loving cars. And it helps when your wife loves them and supports you too.”

Inside King’s Ford Custom, he keeps the exact owner’s manual his father had when he purchased his car from the Casey family in Amherst. The manual has his father’s name in it.

Just after taking a picture of King standing in front of the Ford Custom, Kimberly said she never thought her interest in cars would be as deep as it is.

“It’s appealing. There are so many different models, styles and colours. When he’s restoring cars, I’m right along with him hunting for those parts,” she said.

“The hunt for the little pieces is almost as nice as having the car done itself,” King added.

With Saturday’s portion of the car show rained out, the Kings were delighted to see a constant stream of onlookers walking between the rows and stopping to look at each vehicle.

Doing just that was Jason Selkirk, of Truro, with his two sons, Ethan, 8, and six-year-old Colby.

“Their grandfathers are both car enthusiasts so we came down to talk to them and see the rest of the cars,” said Selkirk. “There are always a couple of really fancy cars here, and then the usuals.”

The younger of the two boys said he’s not a huge fan of cars, but Ethan smiled wide when asked about his favourite car of the show, which happened to be a Camaro SS inside the stadium.

“They’re fancy,” he said.

“The fancier the better, right?” asked Selkirk.

 

rtetanish@trurodaily.com

Twitter: @TDNRaissa

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