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Community concerned about golf balls in Chook Maxwell Park


TRURO – Flying golf balls and children at play aren’t a good mix.

The Chook Maxwell Park, next to the Truro Golf Club driving range, has several balls invade its playground space each day.

Shelley Borden wants to see a meeting of the Truro Golf Club executive, Town of Truro recreation and community members that are concerned about the children’s well being.

“There has to be a meeting of the minds for a long-term solution,” she said. “One representative from the golf course was at our last meeting and was going to take our concerns back there.”

Borden has been told nets at other courses are doing a better job of stopping balls. She thinks what these other courses are doing should be looked at.

“This is a longstanding issue,” said Mike Dolter, Truro CAO. “The nets stop a lot but quite a few get through. The netting has gaps and some go over the top.”

Dolter said some short-term measures are being taken to protect children, such as moving the sand box to an area balls don’t customarily land. Work is expected to be complete within a couple of weeks.

Since July 5, the golf course started closing the driving range from 2-4 p.m. Monday to Friday and from noon until 3 p.m. on weekends so children could play without danger from balls.

“We’re trying to find a better solution,” said Dolter. “We agree that what’s there isn’t working and we’re hoping to meet with residents this week.”

Stuart Cox, director of golf and operations at the Truro Golf Club, is also interested in finding a solution to the problem.

“We’ve been working with residents of the community and the town and we’re just waiting for the town now,” he said. “We’re proposing a long term-solution, something that may potentially be acceptable to everyone.”

lynn.curwin@tc.tc

 

The Chook Maxwell Park, next to the Truro Golf Club driving range, has several balls invade its playground space each day.

Shelley Borden wants to see a meeting of the Truro Golf Club executive, Town of Truro recreation and community members that are concerned about the children’s well being.

“There has to be a meeting of the minds for a long-term solution,” she said. “One representative from the golf course was at our last meeting and was going to take our concerns back there.”

Borden has been told nets at other courses are doing a better job of stopping balls. She thinks what these other courses are doing should be looked at.

“This is a longstanding issue,” said Mike Dolter, Truro CAO. “The nets stop a lot but quite a few get through. The netting has gaps and some go over the top.”

Dolter said some short-term measures are being taken to protect children, such as moving the sand box to an area balls don’t customarily land. Work is expected to be complete within a couple of weeks.

Since July 5, the golf course started closing the driving range from 2-4 p.m. Monday to Friday and from noon until 3 p.m. on weekends so children could play without danger from balls.

“We’re trying to find a better solution,” said Dolter. “We agree that what’s there isn’t working and we’re hoping to meet with residents this week.”

Stuart Cox, director of golf and operations at the Truro Golf Club, is also interested in finding a solution to the problem.

“We’ve been working with residents of the community and the town and we’re just waiting for the town now,” he said. “We’re proposing a long term-solution, something that may potentially be acceptable to everyone.”

lynn.curwin@tc.tc

 

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