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CN Police to be checking rail crossings and tracks in Truro for motorist/pedestrian violations

['Members of Operation Lifesaver, as well as the Truro Police Service, CN Police and Via Rail, were stopping motorists at the railway crossing on Young Street in Truro yesterday morning in a safety blitz aimed at raising awareness. More than 300 collisions occur in Canada each year on railways. ']
Members of Operation Lifesaver, as well as the Truro Police Service, CN Police and Via Rail, are seen in this file photo stopping motorists at the railway crossing on Young Street in Truro during a safety blitz aimed at raising awareness. Last year in Canada, 72 people were killed in vehicles at railway crossings. CN police will be monitoring the area in coming weeks for such transgressions.

TRURO, N.S.

Ever thought about trying to beat a train at a rail crossing?

You may want to give that some sober, second thought, given that, even if the locomotive engineer sees you, it could still take 1.5 kilometres or more for him to stop.

In 2017, according to information provided by CN, 72 fatalities and 44 serious injuries resulted from such infractions in Canada. Overall last year more than 222 incidents relating to the railways and crossings were reported nationwide.

Because of such statistics, the CN Police Service (CNPS) will be conducting railroad crossing enforcement throughout the next few weeks in the Truro area.

CN Police will be patrolling for drivers who fail to obey traffic laws in and around railroad crossings. They will also be on the lookout for pedestrians who are trespassing on railway property, because of a higher number of such incidents during summer months.

 “CNPS encourages all drivers and pedestrians to use caution around railroad crossings and to always obey all crossing warning signs and lights. If you see tracks, think train,” CN said, in a news release.

Driving safety tips:

  • Trains and cars do not mix. Never race a train to the crossing ‐ even if you tie, you lose.
  • The train you see is closer and faster‐moving than you think. If you see a train approaching, wait for it to go by before you proceed across the tracks.
  • Be aware that trains cannot stop quickly. Even if the locomotive engineer sees you, a freight train can take 1.5 km or more to stop. That's 18 football fields.
  • Never drive around lowered gates ‐ it is illegal and extremely dangerous. If you suspect a signal is malfunctioning, call the 1‐800 number posted on or near the crossing signal or contact your local law enforcement agency.
  • Do not get trapped on the tracks; proceed through a highway‐rail grade crossing only if you are sure you can completely clear the crossing without stopping. Remember, the train is much wider than the tracks on both sides.
  • If your vehicle ever stalls on a track with a train coming, exit the vehicle immediately and move quickly away from the tracks in the direction from which the train is coming.  Moving AWAY from the tracks in the direction from which the train is coming can lessen your chance of being stuck by debris after your vehicle is struck by the train.  Call your local law enforcement agency for assistance.
  • At a multiple track crossing waiting for a train to pass, watch out for a second train on the other tracks, approaching from either direction.
  • When you need to cross train tracks, go to a designated crossing and look both ways.  If no trains are coming, cross the tracks quickly, without stopping. Do not stop closer than 4 meters from a track.

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