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Warm ‘blob’ bringing T-shirt weather

Daniel Race, a deckhand aboard the tall ship Silva, prepares the tour boat for the day on a brilliant autumn morning on the waterfront in Halifax on Monday. 
(TIM KROCHAK / THE CHRONICLE HERALD)
Daniel Race, a deckhand aboard the tall ship Silva, prepares the tour boat for the day on a brilliant autumn morning on the waterfront in Halifax on Monday. (TIM KROCHAK / THE CHRONICLE HERALD)

Everything would be perfectly normal if temperatures reached a high of 11.1 C Tuesday at Halifax Stanfield international airport.

But that’s not what’s going to happen.

“We’re looking at highs for the next two days of 10-15 degrees over what would be the average,” said Linda Libby, a meteorologist with Environment and Climate Change Canada.

These warm days will push an already abnormally warm month further out of whack with the 30-year average.

The average temperature in October in Nova Scotia is 8.7 degrees — as of Monday the average temperature this month has been 12.2 degrees.

Libby explains that a whole host of factors goes into creating the weather. But the major

determining factor right now in the Maritimes is that we’re all living in a bubble.

A big warm blob of warm air has been centralized over the entire Maritime region this fall.

Because warm air is lighter than cold air, it means that it actually creates a big hill in the atmosphere over our area of the otherwise roundish earth.

“So what we’ve had is a fairly dominant high pressure ridge over the Maritimes that could in part be contributed to by warmer than normal sea surface temperatures,” said Libby.

This dome of high pressure is causing cooler weather systems that would normally come in from the west to be pushed north as they come over Quebec up toward Labrador. And so we get to walk around in T-shirts.

According to Libby, above average temperatures are likely to continue through the coming weeks. We may pay for it come winter though, she warns, with more powerful storms. “Warm temperatures are a source of energy for storms,” she said.

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