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Truro Art Society to host first sculpture show in March

Truro Art Society members Brandt Eisner and Christene Sandeson will be presenting their pieces entitled Blood Bowl and Triangle at the group's upcoming first sculpture show. Other pieces, such as the clay, raku-fired piece called Torso by France Arruda of the Halifax area will also be on display.
Truro Art Society members Brandt Eisner and Christene Sandeson will be presenting their pieces entitled Blood Bowl and Triangle at the group's upcoming first sculpture show. Other pieces, such as the clay, raku-fired piece called Torso by France Arruda of the Halifax area will also be on display. - Harry Sullivan

TRURO, N.S. – An “eclectic” collection of media and subject matter will be on display next month during the Truro Art Society’s first sculpture show, organizers say.

“So, it will be a really interesting mix. And I think you are going to see everything from very traditional to very contemporary,” said show curator Brandt Eisner.

The wide range of media includes soapstone carvings to clay, metal and textile sculptures.

“I think there is going to be some really beautiful and interesting art in the show.”

The exhibition opens at the McCarthy Gallery at the NSCC Truro campus on March 6 from 6 to 8 p.m. and runs until March 28 during regular library hours, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Twenty individuals, from emerging artists to those at mid-career and the professional level will participate in the show, coming from Truro and other parts of Nova Scotia.

“It’s a nice little mix,” Eisner said.

There is no cost to see the show and Eisner said visitors don’t need to be an artist to enjoy the presentations.

As an art society, he said, members are always trying to get people to engage with artists and break down the general fear of going to a gallery without knowing enough about art.

“It’s getting people to understand you can go to a gallery, a show or whatever, you don’t have to know anything,” he said. “You don’t have to feel like you have to buy anything, you can just go and enjoy the work. And if you don’t like it, that’s OK too. But to experience something outside of the everyday norm and see something that somebody has just created from nothing, has its own benefit to it.”

Fellow society member Christene Sandeson of Truro, who taught art for many years, said one of the goals for the show is to introduce the local community to talent in its midst.

“I would like to see more support from the public as far as coming to see the shows and maybe more support for artists,” she said.

“A person has to realize that almost everything that we live with and own, initially was designed by someone with an artistic intent, whether it’s the chairs you sit on or the furniture you sit on or your clothing, footwear… everything is designed by someone with an artistic background in training or something they’ve worked with and refined over the years.”

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