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Trading bitter cold for ‘significant’ storm

Tom Morris, far right, and his son, Ryan, celebrate their goal against Mike Loder and his son, Mike, while playing hockey on frozen Albro Lake in Dartmouth on Sunday. According to Environment Canada, the recent cold temperatures may be replaced by a nor’easter Thursday.
TIM KROCHAK • THE CHRONICLE HERALD
Tom Morris, far right, and his son, Ryan, celebrate their goal against Mike Loder and his son, Mike, while playing hockey on frozen Albro Lake in Dartmouth on Sunday. According to Environment Canada, the recent cold temperatures may be replaced by a nor’easter Thursday. TIM KROCHAK • THE CHRONICLE HERALD

Out of the deep freeze, into the storm.

While Environment Canada is forecasting a climb out of the double-digit lows — and sometimes even highs — that Nova Scotia has been experiencing, the weather agency is also monitoring what it calls “the potential development of a significant weather system late this week.”

After a couple more days of temperatures that only a snowman could love — highs hovering around -10 C, with a low of -15 C forecast for Monday night and -12 C for Tuesday, thermometers are expected to edge up to -5 C on Wednesday.

But after that one-day reprieve from the weather nasties, a nor’easter may be blowing our way come Thursday, bringing along messy travelling conditions and very high winds.

“This system is forecast

to approach the Maritimes and give significant rain, snow and the possibility of another extended period of very high winds in the Thursday to Friday timeframe,” says the weather warning for Nova Scotia posted on Environment Canada’s website, adding that “it is too early to give a specific or accurate prediction of the precipitation timing, type and amounts.”

Similar warnings are in effect for New Brunswick and P.E.I.

Weather Network meteorologist Doug Gillham says in a story posted on the network’s website that while the storm may bring snow is to New Brunswick and possibly western Nova Scotia, other parts of our province may be in for wet weather.

“Halifax is one of many places that will see a significant impact, but at this point it looks rain will become the dominant precipitation type along with strong winds,” Gillham told the Weather Network. “Fredericton or Saint John are more likely to see a blizzard.”

By the weekend, the sun will be shining again— but temperatures are forecast to fall back

near the minus double-digits.

But, hey, as of Monday, there are only 78 days until spring.

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