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Students trying to make Truro an idle-free community

Members of CEC’s environmental club are pushing to turn Truro into an idle-free area, by selling idle-free zone signs to local businesses. From left, Reann Post, Tara Cashen, Kathryn MacQuarrie and Kathleen O’Conner, executives of the CEC environmental club.
Members of CEC’s environmental club are pushing to turn Truro into an idle-free area, by selling idle-free zone signs to local businesses. From left, Reann Post, Tara Cashen, Kathryn MacQuarrie and Kathleen O’Conner, executives of the CEC environmental club. - Submitted

TRURO, N.S. – A group of high school students is trying to make Truro an idle-free community.

Members of the environmental club at Cobequid Educational Centre are taking steps to push The Town of Truro to become an idle-free municipality by selling idle-free signs to local businesses.

“This is something that affects the whole community,” said Kathleen O'Connor, an executive member of the CEC environmental club.

“We found out if all Canadians cut down idling by five minutes a day, we could prevent two million tonnes of carbon dioxide pollution. If we reduced it by three minutes a day, we would save $630 million in fuel costs for one year. It’s the little things that can add up.”

As part of their yearly project, club members created signs made of corrugated cardboard and are reaching out to local businesses to encourage them to purchase the signs and raise awareness.

“We’re also doing it as a fundraiser to help fund future club projects,” said Reann Post, another executive member.

“In the spring, the club usually does tree planting as a project. We planted over 200 trees last spring, which was a pretty big project. We’re looking to do something like that again this year, and the money we get from this fundraiser could go towards the trees.”

On Thursday, the four executive members of the club presented their project to town council in hopes of getting official idle-free zone signage placed around town in high-idle areas.

“We are looking to get signage posted in Victoria Park, because no one wants to be jogging with their dog and have to smell those gases,” said Kathryn MacQuarrie, another executive.

“We’re also looking at getting signs posted around in bigger parking lots and by the train tracks as those are key areas where idling happens most of the time. Just cutting down on idling by five minutes can save a lot of money and cut down a lot of greenhouse gas emissions.”

As they wait to see what will come from their talks with the town, the club is still reaching out to businesses and offering signs for those looking to become idle-free.

“Our goal right now is to get Truro to become an idle-free municipality,” said Post.

“Nova Scotia has put out a tool kit for municipalities to do this, so we’re hoping to get the work started on that.”

Anyone interested in purchasing an Idle-Free Zone sign, can e-mail tara.cashen@hotmail.com. Each sign is $10.

cody.mceachern@trurodaily.com

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