Top News

Lessons to learn from Maya Angelou documentary coming to Halifax Black Film Festival

A photo from the Maya Angelou documentary screening in Halifax this Saturday
A photo from the Maya Angelou documentary screening in Halifax this Saturday

Many think of Maya Angelou as a legendary poet and writer, but a documentary exploring her early life on the stage, and connections to civil-rights figures like Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., comes to Halifax this weekend.

The inaugural Halifax Black Film Festival (HBFF) will feature the Nova Scotia premiere of Maya Angelou And Still I Rise at the Spatz Theatre this Saturday evening at 7 p.m., as the third sister festival to Montreal International Black Film Festival, and the Toronto Black Film Festival.

“This is not just another film festival. This is the necessary festival in Halifax, this is really important, this is really essential … because it gives a voice and a platform to people who otherwise wouldn’t have been seen or heard,” Fabienne Colas, founder and president of the HBFF said in an interview.

“It gives the audience the opportunity to see unique films that will not come out in theatres afterward.”

Colas, who also founded the Montreal and Toronto events, said she was excited to bring co-director Rita Coburn Whack to the Halifax screening for a Q&A after the film.

Whack said there's a lot to take away from Angelou’s life and passion for fighting prejudice.

“If people become active and … grow in their own communities and their own households, white, black whatever with regard to what prejudice really is and how costly it is not to respect the next human being no matter who they are … I think there’s a lot of lessons there,” Whack said.

In the future Colas said she hopes the HBFF can grow into supporting local black filmmakers, host master classes, and include more local, national and international films.

Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door, and found online at halifaxblackfilm.com.

The inaugural Halifax Black Film Festival (HBFF) will feature the Nova Scotia premiere of Maya Angelou And Still I Rise at the Spatz Theatre this Saturday evening at 7 p.m., as the third sister festival to Montreal International Black Film Festival, and the Toronto Black Film Festival.

“This is not just another film festival. This is the necessary festival in Halifax, this is really important, this is really essential … because it gives a voice and a platform to people who otherwise wouldn’t have been seen or heard,” Fabienne Colas, founder and president of the HBFF said in an interview.

“It gives the audience the opportunity to see unique films that will not come out in theatres afterward.”

Colas, who also founded the Montreal and Toronto events, said she was excited to bring co-director Rita Coburn Whack to the Halifax screening for a Q&A after the film.

Whack said there's a lot to take away from Angelou’s life and passion for fighting prejudice.

“If people become active and … grow in their own communities and their own households, white, black whatever with regard to what prejudice really is and how costly it is not to respect the next human being no matter who they are … I think there’s a lot of lessons there,” Whack said.

In the future Colas said she hopes the HBFF can grow into supporting local black filmmakers, host master classes, and include more local, national and international films.

Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door, and found online at halifaxblackfilm.com.

Latest News