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Dorrington-Skinner takes the helm at CNWRC

Tracey Dorrington-Skinner is enthusiastic about her new position as executive director of the Central Nova Women’s Resource Centre. She stepped into the role on Jan. 22.
Tracey Dorrington-Skinner is enthusiastic about her new position as executive director of the Central Nova Women’s Resource Centre. She stepped into the role on Jan. 22. - Lynn Curwin

TRURO, N.S. – Tracey Dorrington-Skinner decided it was time for a change, and she let life lead her to a position as executive director of the Central Nova Women’s Resource Centre.

“I’d been working in the education system almost 20 years and I decided it was time to do something different,” she said. “I was on a bit of a path of exploration and got my mental health certification. I knew the universe was taking me some place, but I wasn’t sure where. I decided I would go with the flow.”

She applied for the women’s support worker position, and was asked if she wanted to apply for the job of executive director. She settled into her new office on Jan. 22.

“I want to let more people know we’re here and have them come to our events,” she said. “I want to reach out and make sure all populations are comfortable here, and I want people to go away feeling their needs were met. We want them to feel they’ve been uplifted and received service.”

Dorrington-Skinner was born in Truro but spent much of her childhood in the Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children (NSHCC), although she often returned to visit family and the town always felt like home.
While working in education, she was also an advocate on behalf of former residents of the NSHCC, helping to bring a successful class-action lawsuit against the home and the Province of Nova Scotia.
She is co-founder and co-chair of Victims of Institutional Childhood Exploitation Society (VOICES) and co-writer of the terms of reference used to guide the restorative inquiry for the NSHCC.
In Tracey’s spare time, she enjoys painting and spending time with her grandson, as well as taking part in conversation.

“Drop in and say hi,” she urges people. “We want to get to know you and see if there’s something we can help you with.”

lynn.curwin@trurodaily.com

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