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Cobequid hosting dog show this month

Gail Caudle relaxes with two of her Parson Russell terriers, Penne, left, and Addie. She plans to show the two dogs, who are mother and daughter, at the Cobequid Dog Club Show March 24 and 25 in Bible Hill.
Gail Caudle relaxes with two of her Parson Russell terriers, Penne, left, and Addie. She plans to show the two dogs, who are mother and daughter, at the Cobequid Dog Club Show March 24 and 25 in Bible Hill. - Lynn Curwin

ONSLOW MOUNTAIN, N.S. – Gail Caudle knew she wasn’t getting a couch potato when she got her first Parson Russell terrier.

She now has eight members of the high-energy breed, and raises and shows them.

“They want to be busy all the time, and be part of whatever you’re doing,” she said. “I have a big field in my back yard, and I go out and throw balls for them, and we do lots of walking.

“They’re a very active dog with lots of personality, which is why I first decided I wanted one.”

When she was a child, Caudle’s family had mixed breed dogs, and her first Parson Russell terrier was simply a pet. She has now shared her life with the breed for more than 20 years.

Caudle, who has a degree in animal science, began showing her dogs in 2006, when the Canadian Kennel Club first allowed them to compete. Although she isn’t involved in agility events, many of the pups she’s bred take part in competitions.

“They’re great dogs for someone who does a lot of hiking or jogging,” said Caudle. “They need a lot of exercise and you can’t leave them home all day.

“They’re also a very stubborn breed. If they get away with something once they’ll continue to try to get away with it all the time.”

She plans to show two of her dogs, Penne (Can Ch Blackbriar Hidden Treasure) and Addie (Caudlewood Out Of Line), who are mother and daughter, in the Cobequid Dog Club Show, which will be held in Bible Hill in March.

“If people are looking for a specific breed, a show is a good place for them to go and talk to breeders and learn more,” she said. “What you see on TV isn’t always what you’re going to get.”

lynn.curwin@trurodaily.com

Parson Russell terriers

The dogs have three coat types: smooth, rough and broken (a mix of smooth and rough). They were originally bred for flushing prey from a hole, and the breed is named for Reverend John “Jack” Russell (1795 – 1883), a parson who lived in England during the 1800s.

Parson Russell terriers are often confused with Jack Russell terriers, but the Parson Russell terrier was bred as a hunting dog with a high energy level, while the Jack Russell terrier was bred as a companion (and is shorter and mellower).

Shows

Canadian Association of Parson Russell Terrier Fanciers Sanction Match: March 17-

at Little Moe's K9 Academy, Bible Hill

Cobequid Dog Club Show: March 24-25 – Exhibition Hall (gym-ex building), Nova Scotia Provincial Exhibition grounds, Bible Hill

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