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Truro children give to charity through 100 Kids Who Care

A few of the parent-organizers and children involved with 100 Kids Who Care are, front row, from left, Kenzie MacKay, Oakley MacKay, Ruby Munro, Alden Fiddes, Lily Arthurs, Parker Gill-Douglas and Mason Eisner. Second row, Jami MacKay, Ira Fiddes, Andrea Munro, Cara Kirkpatrick, Penny Gill and Carol Eisner.
A few of the parent-organizers and children involved with 100 Kids Who Care are, front row, from left, Kenzie MacKay, Oakley MacKay, Ruby Munro, Alden Fiddes, Lily Arthurs, Parker Gill-Douglas and Mason Eisner. Second row, Jami MacKay, Ira Fiddes, Andrea Munro, Cara Kirkpatrick, Penny Gill and Carol Eisner. - Lynn Curwin

TRURO, N.S.

A group organized by parents is helping children in the Truro area learn the value of giving.

The group, 100 Kids who Care, has been meeting three times a year, for two years, and the children who take part have donated money to several charities.

“This lets them be part of something where they can make a difference, as well as practice their public speaking,” said Penny Gill, a parent-organizer whose son Parker is involved.

“After hearing about 100 women, Parker wanted to go to something like it. We found one in Halifax for kids and learned about their process.”

Each child nominates a charity of their choice, and three are randomly selected. Those whose charities are selected speak for up to five minutes on why they think their charity should be rewarded. Each child brings $10 to add to the pot, which goes to the charity with the most votes. The other two organizations receive a small donation from the group’s sponsor, Toronto Dominion bank.

Between 20 and 70 elementary school-age children attend each meeting.

The most recent organization to be chosen by 100 Kids who Care was the Truro Homeless Outreach Society.

“I nominated them because it’s important to help people get back on their feet,” said nine-year-old Alden Fiddes.

During a meeting earlier this year, there was a tie between the Cobequid Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre and Bible Hill Village Preschool.

The preschool was nominated by Kenzie MacKay, who is now five, but was only four when she made her presentation. She chose the preschool because she was a student there and felt it deserved a donation.

“I nominated the wildlife centre because it’s important to have places that animals who aren’t pets can go,” said Lily Arthurs, 9. “I talked to the person there and got information on lead poisoning in eagles. I want them to be able to help more animals.”

Eight-year-old Oakley MacKay also nominated an animal rescue, but she chose one that handles pets.

“I picked Animal Rescue Coalition because I like animals and I want to be a foster,” she said. “I talked to someone from the group to get information.”

Donations have also been made to several other organizations including Maggie’s Place, Central Nova Women’s Resource Centre, Heart and Stroke Foundation, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, and Colchester SPCA.

lynn.curwin@trurodaily.com

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