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Joggins Fossil Centre celebrates 10th Anniversary as World Heritage Site on Saturday

Laurie Glenn Norris, education and outreach manager at the Joggins Fossil Institute, goes over the schedule for the 10th anniversary celebrations. A lot of family fun is scheduled for Saturday's event. Glenn Norris grew up in Lower Cove, not far from the Joggins Fossil Cliffs.
Laurie Glenn Norris, education and outreach manager at the Joggins Fossil Institute, goes over the schedule for the 10th anniversary celebrations. A lot of family fun is scheduled for Saturday's event. Glenn Norris grew up in Lower Cove, not far from the Joggins Fossil Cliffs. - Dave Mathieson

Minudie Days Sunday in Minudie

JOGGINS – July 7, 2008. That is the day the name of the Joggins Fossil Cliffs was officially inscribed upon the World Heritage List, making it a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Saturday, July 7, 2018. That’s the day Joggins Fossil Festival will celebrate the 10th anniversary of that historic event.

“There will be remarks at 9 a.m. from Dr. John Calder from the Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources. He was one of the key players in getting the UNESCO designation for the Joggins Fossil Cliffs,” said Laurie Glenn Norris, education and outreach manager at the Joggins Fossil Institute. “We will also have the blessing of the Joggins Fossil Cliffs by Emile Gautreau and Louise Goodwin, two Mi’kmaq elders.”
Glenn Norris has worked at the Joggins Fossil Institute for two and a half years.

“I’m very excited to be part of it. It’s a major accomplishment for the Joggins Institute and for the community in general,” said Glenn Norris. “It’s an indication of how something that was so long in the making was successful and continues to grow and prosper.”
Glenn Norris grew up in Lower Cove, not far from the fossil cliffs, where she says she had a ‘lovely childhood’ riding her bike and swimming at the beach.

“I grew up looking at the water and looking at the fossil cliffs, so it’s nice to be a part of the 10th anniversary because it’s a part of my upbringing,” she said.

“Also, it’s nice to see the cliffs preserved and recognized because I, personally, grew up taking this for granted,” she added. “Now there’s less of a chance that people will take it for granted because of the fossil centre and because of the visibility we have here.”

The Joggins Fossil Cliffs have been studied extensively by world-renowned geologists since the early 1800’s.

“The importance of the cliffs has been known among geologists for a very long time,” said Glenn Norris. “But the centre and the UNESCO designation have helped the layperson know how important the cliffs really are.”

Festivities go all day Saturday and included the following:

9 a.m. – Opening remarks from Dr. John Calder of the Nova Scotia Department of Natural Resources and, also, the Blessing of the Cliffs by Emile Gautreau and Louise Goodwin, two Mi’kmaq elders.

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. – Vendor’s Marketplace, and chalk drawing and colouring activities.

Historical and genealogical societies information booth. There will also be a special treat for those who like ponies. Time to be announced.

10 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. – Face painting and tattoos.

10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. – Behind-the-scenes collection tours with Dr. Melissa Grey, curator of science at the Joggins Fossil Institute. Cost is $10 and there is limited space. To register call the Joggins Fossil Cliffs at 902-251-2727.

2 to 3 p.m. – Storytelling with Elizabeth Copeland, the ArtScape Artist in Residence. Copeland has told stories at the Canadian National Exhibition, the Women's Leadership Forum, and the Toronto International Storytelling Festival

6 p.m. – Public anniversary reception. Everyone Welcome.

Minudie Days are Sunday in Minudie

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. – Barbeque and strawberry shortcake, yard sales, live music, 50/50 draw, tours of the Amos Seaman School Museum, the St. Denis Church, and the King Seaman Church, antique cars and tractors, and much more.

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