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Colchester Historeum holding open house on Heritage Day

Young people were enjoying the outdoors in Great Village in January 1930
Young people were enjoying the outdoors in Great Village in January 1930 - Contributed

TRURO, NS

What could be more fitting than spending time at the Colchester Historeum during Heritage Day?

The historeum is holding and open house, and marking the opening of a new exhibit, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Monday, February 19.

The ‘Colchester on Ice’ exhibit includes images from the past, skates that once carried Colchester residents across the ice and hockey memorabilia.

Many of the skates on display were made in Dartmouth, by the Starr Manufacturing Company. Their skates were worn around the world and were the choice of most NHL players. The company also made the golden gates for Point Pleasant Park, Nova Scotia’s first iron bridge, and parts for railways.

The oldest skates in the display were made of a wooden platform with a metal blade underneath, and fastened to a boot with straps and buckles. Metal skates that included a lever

that enabled them to be attached to a boot were an improvement. The company went on to make skates with a blade attached to boot, and continued manufacturing until 1939.

One of the quotes includes in the display is from Edna Rhind, who was born in 1892 and remembered skating on the Stewiacke River when it froze over. She said:

“The only trouble was the river moved up and down with the tide, there were often wide cracks between the bank and the ice… We used to put hot baked potatoes wrapped in newspaper in out boots so they would be nice and warm to change into, and on the way home we ate the potatoes.”

Admission to the historeum is free on Heritage Day but visitors are encouraged to bring an item for the food bank.

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1919 ad
Starr Manufacturing
Starr Manufacturing

 

Some early skates consisted of a wooden platform with a metal blade underneath. They were held in place by straps and buckles, and if a skater stopped quickly the wooden section could split.
Some early skates consisted of a wooden platform with a metal blade underneath. They were held in place by straps and buckles, and if a skater stopped quickly the wooden section could split.
The Acme skates, made by the Starr Manufacturing Company, in Dartmouth, had a mechanical lever that enabled them to be attached to a boot.
The Acme skates, made by the Starr Manufacturing Company, in Dartmouth, had a mechanical lever that enabled them to be attached to a boot.

 

The Starr Manufacturing Company created brown women’s skates with an attached blade
The Starr Manufacturing Company created brown women’s skates with an attached blade
The Starr Manufacturing Company made skates until 1939. They were worn by most NHL players.
The Starr Manufacturing Company made skates until 1939. They were worn by most NHL players.

 

Audrey Hanrahan’s painting of skaters in Truro has been loaned to the historeum, by the town, for the exhibit. It depicts skaters on an old gravel pit, in the area that’s now Kiwanis Pond.
Audrey Hanrahan’s painting of skaters in Truro has been loaned to the historeum, by the town, for the exhibit. It depicts skaters on an old gravel pit, in the area that’s now Kiwanis Pond.

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