What started as an unblemished canvas above the lips and below the nose has turned into works of 'art' or in some cases prime examples of why shaving is a preferred morning ritual. Here are some of the local men of Movember who are willing to put aside self-respect to grow what they can and raise awareness and money for prostate cancer research.

They are your dads, uncles, brothers, husbands, sons and friends and they need your help raising money for through the month of 'Movember'. To support them, click here and follow the directions.

Brian Frizzell Brian Halls Grant Rhodenizer Kevin Russell Kyle Squires James Thomson
Brian Frizzell
Hometown: Truro
Reason for participation: Family members have been affected.
Dream 'Stache: Freestyle
Brian Halls
Hometown: Truro
Reason for participation: To raise money and awareness for prostate cancer.
Dreame 'Stache: Fu Manchu
Grant Rhodenizer
Hometown: Truro
Reason for participation: Just to support the cause. I don't have any friends or family members who have been affected by prostate cancer, but you never know these days.
Dream 'Stache: Freestyle
Kevin Russell
Hometown: Dartmouth, now lives in Truro
Reason for participation: My grandfather died from prostate cancer two years ago. He was about 84 years old.
Dream 'Stache: freestyle
Kyle Squires
Hometown: Truro
Reason for participation: The same as everyone else - to support the cause.
Dream 'Stache: Hulk Hogan's horseshoe
James Thomson
Hometown: Toronto, now lives in Truro
Reason for participation: My grandfather passed away in 1981 at the age of 72 to prostate cancer.
Dream 'Stache: handlebar
Brian Frizzell Brian Halls Grant Rhodenizer Kevin Russell Kyle Squires James Thomson
Brian Frizzell
Nov. 9
Brian Halls
Nov. 13
Grant Rhodenizer
Nov. 9
Kevin Russell
Nov. 9
Kyle Squires
Nov. 9
James Thomson
Nov. 9
Brian Frizzell Brian Halls Grant Rhodenizer Kevin Russell Kyle Squires James Thomson
Brian Frizzell
Nov. 16
Brian Halls
Nov. 16
Grant Rhodenizer
Nov. 16
Kevin Russell
Nov. 16
Kyle Squires
Nov. 16
James Thomson
Nov. 16
Brian Frizzell Brian Halls Grant Rhodenizer Kevin Russell Kyle Squires James Thomson
Brian Frizzell
Nov. 23
Brian Halls
Nov. 23
Grant Rhodenizer
Nov. 23
Kevin Russell
Nov. 23
Kyle Squires
Nov. 23
James Thomson
Nov. 23
Brian Frizzell Brian Halls Grant Rhodenizer Kevin Russell Kyle Squires James Thomson
Brian Frizzell
Nov. 30
Brian Halls
Nov. 30
Grant Rhodenizer
Nov. 30
Kevin Russell
Nov. 30
Kyle Squires
Nov. 30
James Thomson
Nov. 30

 

Tips from Movember Canada for grooming and styling moustaches:
  • • Shampoo regularly. As becoming as they are, moustaches collect things and no matter how fine the food, it doesn't belong in your Mo.
  • • Moustache hair is coarse and benefits from regular conditioning. Massage your Mo with a dollop of conditioner then rinse thoroughly. It will make it softer to touch to both you and your intimate friends.
  • • Use a hot face washer to steam and cleanse the skin under your moustache that can suffer from drying and itching.
  • • Invest in the right equipment. A man of fine and serious moustachery should have a pair of barber scissors for precise trimming; a fine toothed comb for guidance; a bright and large mirror for a good view; a razor, a steady hand and a sensible mind.
  • • Dampen the moustache hair to trim. Wet hair is easier to cut but dry hair easier to trim. It is important to note that wet hair does bounce up when dry.
  • • Using a fine-toothed comb, tidy your moustache so the hairs run in the direction you intend them to and lasso any strays into line.
  • • Using the barber scissors, trim longer and stray hairs on the outer edge and bottom line of your moustache. You may wish to use a finger to hold or the fine toothed comb as a barber would to hold the hair as you trim.
  • • For more elaborate styles, use a fine and appropriate moustache wax to shape the remaining hair into place.

Break out the razors

'This was the first time I had taken my moustache off in 30 some-odd years'

TRURO – Tom Selleck and Hulk Hogan, greasy and a cheap porn star.

Those are just a couple of things six men from MBW Courier’s Truro office participating in the Movember initiative have heard since they put their razors down more than four weeks ago.

“I thought it was pretty interesting,” said Kevin Russell. “The looks and the comments that I had gotten. I thought it was funny how my moustache grew in – blonde and red when my hair is brown.” Russell and five other men at the business – Grant Rhodenizer, Brian Halls, Brian Frizzell, James Thomson and Kyle Squires, have been letting the hair above their upper lip grow for the past month in support of prostate cancer research and awareness, and well as men’s mental health issues.

“I felt more manly,” said Squires, who participated in the initiative at the business last year. “But most people knew what we were doing. When they saw us, they knew it was for Movember.”

For most of the men, they were surprised at how slowly their facial hair grew over the month and the majority plan on being clean shaven by the end of today. Both Thomson and Frizzell plan on keeping theirs, as the two began the month of November by shaving their facial hair to begin the initiative.

“I don’t think I’d participate next year,” said Frizzell. “I think I would just donate money. This was the first time I had taken my moustache off in 30 some-odd years. It feels funny.”

“I think I had more comments when I shaved (to start Movember) than throughout the month,” Thomson added, noting he always had a full goatee and continuously trimmed his moustache throughout Movember.

By living with a moustache for the month, the men realized not only can it be a bit of work to keep, but can sometimes be a nuisance.

“Coffee… the moustache soaks it all up,” said Squires.

“I noticed that last night with a glass of milk too,” added Russell.

Not being used to a moustache, Rhodenizer said it was a bit itchy at times. “It was a long month. I can’t wait to shave it off,” he said. “I say no about doing it again, but I probably will. It’s for a good cause.”

When Halls walked into the main foyer at the office, Rhodenizer said he had the best moustache of them all.

“It was awesome,” Halls said of growing the moustache. “I had a few funny comments from people saying I had a nice Hulk Hogan moustache happening or a styling fu Manchu. I had fun doing it.” Halls said a number of his customers donated money to the cause and he wanted to thank them, as well as those that participated.

“It’s about time that men stepped up to the plate to raise money for cancer,” he said. In total, the crew from MBW raised $425 to the cause.

Show me the moustache money

TRURO – The final days of November are on us and the men of our community either look a little more rugged, a little more sophisticated and, in some cases, a little more goofy than they normally do.

It’s been an active Movember for these men.

The month started with a good shave followed by care and consideration how to sport their moustaches of the month. But at the heart of Movember isn’t the mustaches – it’s health.

Registered participants created profile pages on the Movember.ca website and raised funds specifically for prostate cancer research and male mental health initiatives. Nationally, Prostate Cancer Canada – who fund a number of research initiatives – and Movember’s own Movember Foundation are the benefactors.

But it’s not easy money.

“I think if you don’t keep in mind what happens to the money the whole thing falls flat,” Movember Canada’s national director Pete Bombaci says. “We have a global action plan where 200 or so of the top researchers get together and are asked to tackle one issue globally. Our request of them is pick one thing; what is going to be the game changer and go after that.”

It’s a strategy that nets results, Bombaci says. As an example he points to Movember’s challenge last year for researchers to develop a complimentary test to the standard Prostate-Specific Antigent (PSA) Test.

A PSA test, Bombaci says, tells the patient if they have prostate cancer, but it fails to determine if it is aggressive or not. The complimentary test’s goal is to change that, helping patients learn what the road ahead will look like, determine a level of treatment and potentially offer savings to the healthcare system.

“There’s lots of upsides to challenging the researchers like that,” Bombaci says. “But one of the great things about the global action plan is the sharing. Everybody knows what everybody is researching or going to research. Just as an example, one of our researchers said during the global conference call he was about to research a certain thing and one of the U.K. researchers kind of raised his hand – in a teleconference kind of way – and said, ‘By the way, I just did that research and I’ll send you the results.’ It saves time, money and drops duplication, getting us to the quickest results.”

The other agenda Movember focuses on is men and boys mental health, a field often ignored or overlooked, Bombaci says. While there are many groups and organizations out there, funding any one mental health project is new waters for Movember Canada and, like their funding of prostate cancer research, there’s benefit to networking. Movember Canada is pushing forward with a mental health advisory board through their own Movember Foundation to guide them on their first initiative, Bombaci said. A think tank of 30 to 40 of the top minds in male mental health will present their recommendation before a request for proposals is issued.

“Then it’s open to any organization in the country – or new organization– that is already doing the work or wants to take on the challenge,” Bombaci said. “They’ll be able to apply through a transparent process open to everybody.

“I think one of the things the Movember members are proud of: fundraisers know the funds are spent efficiently and effectively.” And rightly so.

As of Nov. 21, Movember Canada has raised $20,889,785, almost twice as much as the United States (Bombaci cautions a U.S. election, Hurricane Sandy and the NHL lockout were tremendous distractions for American Mo Bros and expects 2013 to be the year the U.S. takes the leader board for fundraising).

Internationally, $62,002,371 is destined towards male mental and physical health research coffers, on top of the $170 million raised world wide since Movember as we know it took shape in 2004.

What is prostate cancer?

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer to affect Canadian men. One in seven men will be diagnosed with the disease in their lifetime.

Prostate cancer is a disease where some prostate cells have lost normal control of growth and division. They no longer function as healthy cells.

A cancerous prostate cell has the following features:
• Uncontrolled growth
• Abnormal structure
• The ability to move to other parts of the body (invasiveness).

Prostate cancer can be slow-growing and some men who develop prostate cancer may live many years without ever having the cancer detected. It is important to get screened regularly so that if you do develop prostate cancer, the appropriate action can be taken. A significant proportion of prostate cancers, if untreated, may have serious consequences.

Who gets prostate cancer?

There is no single cause of prostate cancer. However, some factors make developing prostate cancer more likely.

Age: The chance of getting prostate cancer rises quickly after a man reaches age 50. Age is the most important risk factor for prostate cancer.

Race: Prostate cancer is more common in men of African or Caribbean descent and less common in men of Asian descent.

Family history: Genetics plays a role - the risk of prostate cancer increases if close family members have had the disease.

Diet: Men who eat a low-fibre, high-fat diet have a higher rate of prostate cancer. Research suggests that saturated fat (commonly found in processed foods, whole-milk dairy products and fatty cuts of meat) increases the production of the hormone testosterone, which may help prostate cancer cells grow. 

Lifestyle: Having a high Body Mass Index (BMI) may increase the risk of prostate cancer. Being physically active is a good preventative tactic, along with losing weight and eating the right foods. Consuming lycopene (found in tomatoes and tomato products), soy, green tea and cruciferous vegetables (such as broccoli), among other foods and nutrients, may help to prevent prostate cancer.

It is possible to develop prostate cancer even when none of these risk factors is present.

Source: www.prostatecancer.ca

Moustache mania raises funds for cancer research

TRURO - Their faces may not have much facial hair now, but in almost four weeks time, it will be another story.

Six employees with MBW's Truro office are ditching their razors and growing moustaches in support of Movember, a global movement to bring awareness and funding to prostate cancer.

"This is a fun thing for us," said Grant Rhodenizer, projects manager with the office and one of the six participants. "It's for a good cause and it's a little competition between us."

Joining Rhodenizer for the challenge are Kyle Squires, Kevin Russell, James Thomson, Brian Frizzell and Brian Halls.

When asked what kind of moustache would be their dream, many of the men didn't know and are just letting it grow freestyle. However, Squires has an inspiration in mind. 

"Hulk Hogan's," said Squires. "It's cool and it's a manly moustache."

While there are many different types of moustaches, Thomson said he's aiming to grow a handlebar moustache, which is what Halls originally said, but then changed his mind to a Fu Manchu.

The participants all have the same reason for participating - to support the cause. Both Russell and Thomson's grandfathers have passed away from prostate cancer.

Not having anyone close to him that's been directly affected by prostate cancer, Rhodenizer knows that can change any minute.

"I really think this will bring more awareness to our office. There are a lot of men here at that age, and a couple of our employees have relatives that are battling other cancers. I think people think more about it when it's somebody you know."

Starting in Melbourne, Australia, in 2003, the movement has grown to inspire more than 1.9 million people to participate in various locations, such as Canada, United States, United Kingdom, South Africa, Ireland and Finland, to name a few. Since the movement started, more than $301 million Canadian has been raised.

In Canada last year, there were 245,000 participants, raising $42 million.

A crew from MBW participated last year, with one of the owners of the company donating $500 to the cause. That was the only money the company raised last year, however, they're changing things up a bit this time around.

"We are planning on collecting sponsors and pledges this year. I'll be hitting up friends and family, more or less," said Rhodenizer.

While the group hasn't discussed a monetary goal for this year, Rhodenizer said the company is once again going to make a contribution.

"And there have been a few employees who have opted out of growing a moustache, but who are still going to make a donation. We decided to do it again this year because people kept asking if we were going to."

The Movember campaign has a number of strategic goals, such as survivorship initiatives that provide information and support for men and their families affected by prostate cancer. The initiatives help men make informed decisions, which improves their quality of life.

Funding also goes toward awareness and education programs, which help men understand the health risk they face and encourage them to act on that knowledge. Catalytic research and clinical trials infrastructure also benefit from Movember, as do male mental health programs.

Editor's note: For more information on Movember, visit http://ca.movember.com/.


Candace Myers, of Mineville, calls Tom Selleck’s moustache her favourite of all the celebrities.

Debbie Blois, of Gore, doesn’t mind a moustache as long as personal hygiene is up-kept.

Truro’s Kenda MacLellan has a positive reaction to a man and a moustache, calling them sexy.

Laura Pook, an Old Barns resident, only enjoys a man in a moustache for the month of Movember, which supports prostate cancer research and men’s mental health issues.

Women supporting moustaches for the month

'They suit some men better than others and I like them if they look good'

TRURO – With many men sporting facial hair these days for Movember, the women in their lives are lending their support as well, if only for the cause.

“I can put up with them for Movember but that’s it,” said Old Barns resident Laura Pook. “This is for a good cause but I like men clean shaven.”

The Movember movement started in Australia nine years ago to bring awareness to prostate cancer – the most common cancer to affect men, including Canadians. Awareness for the month also surrounds men’s mental health issues, and some participants, including six from MBW’s Truro office, are raising money for the cause.

“Movember is a good event and it’s fun for people but I prefer men without a moustache,” said Jenny Burke, of Truro.

While many women such as Pook and Burke prefer nothing above a man’s upper lip, there are some that find the facial hair downright sexy.

“Brad Pitt and George Clooney also look good with moustaches,” said Beth MacKay. “They suit some men better than others and I like them if they look good.”

 

The New Glasgow woman, however, likes Tom Selleck’s moustache, the same ‘stache that Mineville’s Candace Myers calls her favourite.

Myers said it’s “awesome” that many men throughout the world (245,000 in Canada last year; 1.9 million world-wide) participate in the event. “There are two men in my household doing this and one has grown a beard and everything. They can look nice and add character to a face,” she said.

Kenda MacLellan, of Truro, is also positive about the appearance of a moustache. She said they can be sexy and she is especially fond of them at this time of year. The most attractive man with a moustache she has seen is Ryan Gosling.

Similar to Myers, MacLellan has two sons in their 20s who are currently growing moustaches, one especially for Movember. Debbie Blois, of Gore, doesn’t mind a moustache as long as it is well groomed and clean.